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Britons and their collectibles in late eighteenth-century India
Tillman W. Nechtman

life in South Asia. 60 At Daylesford, Hastings commissioned architects and artists to fill the estate with reminders of his past in India. He called in the sculptor Thomas Banks to design a fireplace for him. The result, which still exists in the house today, was a marble mantel balanced on the heads of two South Asian women between whom Banks carved a series of scenes

in The cultural construction of the British world
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Towards creolizing transnational South Asian art histories
Alpesh Kantilal Patel

upon. Chapter 5 focuses on space and site. It pivots partly around my experience of viewing the installation Sphere:dreamz in spring 2006 in Manchester, England – where I lived from 2005 to 2008. The work was produced by Sphere – a collective of Manchester-based, queer-identified South Asian women – and was strategically situated near Canal Street, the epicentre of the Gay Village, an area of the city with many gay bars and restaurants. The queer feminist transnational South Asian art history within which I write about the work of Sphere, I entangle with my own

in Productive failure
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Sara Upstone

more specific marker of a strident female British Asian consciousness which is actively involved in a process of re-imagining the manner in which identity is framed. As Hussain tells us, ‘South Asian women have redefined the very idea of South Asianness and South Asian womanhood within both the minority and majority cultures as they give voice to their resistance to oppression.’42 The issue of female solidarity has always been of great importance to Syal. ‘The Traveller’, for example, tells of women who have lost their wings to the ‘land of the wingless’, a fable for

in British Asian fiction
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Writing queer feminist transnational South Asian art histories
Alpesh Kantilal Patel

Manchester-based annual international arts festival (now defunct) dedicated to promoting queer arts and culture in the northwest of England.69 The installation highlighted the limits of the commercial and civic production of Canal Street as a public spatial identification by surfacing issues of gender, faith and race as intersectional with sexuality (Plate 10 and Figure 5.1). The work foregrounded the lives of queer South Asian women. For example, the headboard of one of the beds in Sphere:dreamz had been replaced with a women’s bathroom door from a queer bar or club

in Productive failure
Racial capitalism and workplace resistance
Ben Rogaly

_status_fair_enough/ (accessed January 2019). 73 Sundari Anitha and Ruth Pearson, Striking Women: Struggles and Strategies of South Asian Women Workers from Grunwick to Gate Gourmet (London: Lawrence and Wishart, 2018). 74 Discussed further below, ‘cherry-picking’ refers to the selection of items of a certain size and convenience to pack that enable a higher level of output than could be obtained with items that take longer or are more awkward to pack. 75 Spalding is 33 miles (53 kilometres) to the north-east of Peterborough. 76 As I elaborated in Chapter 1, this concept is inspired by

in Stories from a migrant city
Histories of mobility and fixity
Ben Rogaly

.org/2016/07/05/viewpoint-brexit-class-and-britishnational-identity/ (accessed February 2019). 57 Sundari Anitha and Ruth Pearson, Striking Women: Struggles and Strategies of South Asian Women Workers from Grunwick to Gate Gourmet (London: Lawrence & Wishart, 2018). 70 stories from a migrant city 58 Brah, Cartographies of Diaspora, pp. 2 and 35; Kalra, From Textile Mills to Taxi Ranks, p. 2. 59 Ali Ahmad, ‘Gender and generation in Pakistani migration: a critical study of masculinity’, in Louise Ryan and Wendy Webster (eds), Gendering Migration: Masculinity

in Stories from a migrant city
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Non-elite cosmopolitanism in the Brexit era
Ben Rogaly

: Struggles and Strategies of South Asian Women Workers from Grunwick to Gate Gourmet (London: Lawrence & Wishart, 2018); Joe Rogaly, Grunwick (London: Penguin, 1977). 105 Gilroy, After Empire, p. 154; see also Valluvan, ‘Cosmopolitanism and intelligibility’. 106 Debbie Humphry, ‘Moving on? Experiences of social mobility in a mixed-class north London neighbourhood’ (PhD thesis, University of Sussex, 2014). 107 See Akala, Natives. In contrast to me, Akala grew up in a lone-parent working-class household. Other recent research on Kentish Town by Sophie Watson – in her

in Stories from a migrant city
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John McLeod

plantation owners taking slaves to put to work as servants in their homes, or the use of South Asian women as ‘ayahs’ by families employed by the East India Company during and after their return to Britain. If the European empires changed life in colonised countries, then Europe too was changed forever by its colonial encounters. As Sandra Ponzanesi and Daniela Merolla argue, ‘[m]igrations have always been a part of human civilization from ancient times to our days’ ( Migrant Cartographies: New Cultural and Literary Spaces in Post-Colonial Europe , Lexington Books, 2005

in Beginning postcolonialism (second edition)
Simon Peplow

shocking history of ‘virginity tests’ conducted upon South Asian women migrating to Britain during 1968–​79, which they describe as ‘the epitome of an attitude of racial superiority and dominance over the black “other” rooted in Britain’s colonial past’.22 Introducing a class perspective, Satnam Virdee demonstrated that the British working-​class helped intensify negative reactions through the racialisation of British nationalism. Minority ethnic migrants were viewed as outsiders and ‘a source of cheap “foreign” labour deployed by unscrupulous employers with the

in Race and riots in Thatcher’s Britain
Philip Begley

accounts of the dispute can be found in Beckett, Lights , Sandbrook, Seasons and J. McGowan, ‘“Dispute”, “Battle”, “Siege”, “Farce”? – Grunwick 30 Years On’, Contemporary British History , Vol. 22, No. 3, 2008, amongst others. A valuable online resource has also been created as part of the ‘Striking Women: Voices of South Asian Women Workers from Grunwick and Gate Gourmet’ exhibition: www.leeds.ac.uk/strikingwomen . However, these accounts, and many others, appear to derive most of their information from J. Rogaly, Grunwick (Harmondsworth, 1977), which remains a

in The making of Thatcherism