Clare Jackson

On 5 November 1711, the Chancellor of Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin, John Travers, preached a sermon in the cathedral before the Irish Lord Lieutenant, James Butler, second duke of Ormond. It being the anniversary of the Gunpowder Plot, Travers reminded his congregation that, just over a century ago, the ‘Powder was actually plac’d in a Cellar under the Parliament House … and the Train was laid for setting

in The later Stuart Church, 1660–1714
Gabriel Glickman

In 1689, in the wake of the Revolution that toppled a Catholic king from the throne of the three kingdoms, an anonymous treatise was circulated among the clergymen of the English College at Douai. ‘Lost or stolen from the Ld Archbishop of Canterbury’, it advertised, ‘a Cassock and Cloak made up of the Church of England’, a garment ‘finely dyed with the Doctrine of Non-resistance … that shined like

in The later Stuart Church, 1660–1714
The failure of congregational ideas in the Mersey Basin region, 1636–41
James Mawdesley

Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic Chapter 3 Peers, pastors and the particular church: the failure of congregational ideas in the Mersey Basin region, 1636–41 James Mawdesley O n 3 January 1641, Samuel Eaton clambered into the pulpit of St John’s church in Chester. Eaton was an idiosyncratic character. The son of a Cheshire vicar, he had trod the familiar path to Cambridge University before being appointed as the rector of the Wirral parish of West Kirby in 1628. At the bishop of Chester’s visitation that year, Eaton and five parishioners were

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
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How it changed
Rosemary O’Day

4035 The debate.qxd:- 9/12/13 08:37 Page 192 7 The Church: how it changed Introduction While they were absorbed with the issue of the spread of Protestantism during the English Reformation, most historians gave almost passing attention to an equally important question: what impact did the Reformation have upon the Church of England as an institution? This was perhaps due to the fact that by the later 1960s it was now historians rather than ecclesiastical historians who had command of the field. Nevertheless, some work was produced which helped to provide

in The Debate on the English Reformation
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Phil McCluskey

7 The church The French Government was well aware of the importance of religion in managing conquered populations.1 The church was central to the diffusion of pro- (or anti-) French views; as with the lay elites, the co-operation of the clergy was vital in maintaining order. Lorraine and Savoy were predominantly Catholic societies, and the clergy possessed immense influence over consciences and public opinion, but experience in several newly annexed provinces showed that the loyalties of the religious elites could be the most difficult to win out of all of the

in Absolute monarchy on the frontiers
Alec Ryrie

The origins of the Scottish Reformation Chapter 1 A ‘corrupt’ Church? ‘CORRUPTION’ AND ITS IMPORTANCE A fter 1560, when Roman Catholics looked back on the disaster that had engulfed their Church in Scotland, they knew who to blame. There was the greed of the nobles, the lassitude of the common people and – of course – the depravity of the Protestants. Above all, however, they blamed themselves. Lord Herries, who had repented of his own former Protestantism, described the years before the crisis in a tone of lamentation: It is certain that in these days the

in The origins of the Scottish Reformation
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S. Karly Kehoe

histories are treated so separately by scholars on both sides of the water.2 This book, by contrast, has sought to bring their mutual dependence and influence to the fore through the study of religiosity, gender and ethnicity. The Catholic Church in Scotland became a multi-faceted institution that was neither purely Scottish nor purely Irish. Nor was it wholly British. It was characterised by a fusion of cultures and peoples with differing values and priorities. The church, as it exists today, could not have developed without the mass Irish migration that shook its

in Creating a Scottish Church
Ulrike Ehret

05-ChurchNationRace_178-235 28/11/11 14:44 Page 178 5 Responses to fascism The failure of the Catholic Church to criticise the National Socialist regime for its discrimination against German Jews and eventually the persecution and murder of European Jewry has been attributed either to ideological affinities, in particular Catholic antisemitism and a fear of socialism, or structural restraints imposed by the dictatorial regimes in Europe.1 In the case of Hitler’s Germany, historians have also referred to the intransigence of the regime regarding one of the

in Church, nation and race
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S. Karly Kehoe

Introduction Between the Reformation and the middle of the nineteenth century, Catholics in Scotland were confined to small pockets in the north-east, the south-west and in the desolate and isolated villages of the western Highlands and Islands. The only people who received any kind of regular instruction were the aristocratic recusants who employed their own priests. Everyone else had to make do with a handful of inconspicuous chapels and infrequent visits from disguised missionaries. This outlawed, underground church bore little resemblance to the one that

in Creating a Scottish Church
Devotion, association and community
S. Karly Kehoe

working-class consciousness that would grow stronger as the century closed. Land tenure and Home Rule spurred a nationalist energy that united people, and principles of citizenship were being contested by women, who wanted to participate and who were dissatisfied with their marginalised status. This ideological upheaval was threatening to the Catholic Church and forced it to find new ways of engaging people. The development of an associational and devotional culture that would appeal to both sexes and all age groups was prioritised. Catholic education had opened the

in Creating a Scottish Church