3 Citizenship of the European Union The legal position and its development Since the 1970s, the view that popular legitimacy would be a precondition for development of the EU as a unitary and purposive actor in international affairs has prevailed among EU political elites. The influential 1975 Report by Leo Tindemans, a former Belgian Prime Minister, in its call for a more distinctive EU ‘identity’ on the international stage, hinted at later ideas of both Union citizenship1 and attempts to create a European anthropos contained in the recommendations of the

in Supranational Citizenship

(frequently) variable ways (see also Jarvis and Lister 2015a ). In order to assess these impacts upon security and citizenship more specifically, this chapter offers a brief overview of our own approach to these complex and contested concepts. We begin by exploring how recent scholarship on security has sought, first, to escape the state-centrism of earlier work in this area and, second, to examine the

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security

The organic imperialism of Lionel Curtis and the nascent cosmopolitan imperialism of John Buchan demonstrate two strains of early twentieth-century thought on citizenship and the Empire. Those men, however, travelled in the worlds of political philosophy and the civil service. They were, with only occasional exceptions, 1 strangers to the world of

in Imperial citizenship

This book analyses the development of male leisure against the changing notions of citizenship which underpinned perceptions of British society during the period 1850-1945. It opens with an examination of the 'leisure' problem of the middle decades of the nineteenth century. After the defeat of Chartism and associated challenges to the employers' right to organise the workplace, factory owners, the clergy and philanthropists established schemes of rational recreation designed to attract and educate working-class males. The book explores how schemes of rational recreation attempted to create the model citizen and the impact of these strategies on male working-class leisure. Taking three influential leisure activities - drink, the music hall and association football - the book explores their impact on both concepts of citizenship and male leisure patterns. In addition, commercial leisure also highlighted the marked gender divides in leisure activities found within working-class households. The book investigates the generational issues that shaped male working-class leisure. The increase in non-apprenticed semi-skilled work, particularly in the 'new' industry regions, raised fears that monotonous working practices and new leisure activities were a dangerous social cocktail. Moreover the book investigates how, during the late Victorian and early Edwardian era, the problem of a 'degenerate' youth became entwined with anxieties over the future of empire. It further contextualises male leisure against the dominant concerns between 1918 and 1945. This era saw the suburbanisation of British cities, continued anxieties over male citizenry and increased international tensions that led to war.

This chapter follows the previous discussion of public evaluations of anti-terrorism powers by examining the impact thereof on citizens and citizenship more specifically. Two main findings from our research are discussed. First, that anti-terrorism powers have impacted – variably – on four key aspects of citizenship: rights, participation, identity and duties. As

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security

3 Citizenship and popular culture Where the previous chapter explored the traditions of thought that connected politics with popular culture, this one looks in detail at the latter’s relationship with the specifics of citizenship. For many writers it is not a happy relationship. As we have seen, Adorno and Horkheimer, and more recently Robert Putnam, are just a few examples of those who have cast a critical and (more often than not) pessimistic eye on popular culture’s potential to invigorate the public sphere. Together, these writers alert us to the harm that

in From entertainment to citizenship

9 Playing with citizenship So far we have represented our participants as a thoughtful bunch. When they reflected on the political efficacy of celebrities or the wider social significance of a storyline in, for example, a soap opera, they showed their ability to reflect critically on political issues, often doing so in a serious manner. In such moments, these young people came very close to the ‘ideal type citizen’ that we discussed in Chapter 3. They were calm and rational when formulating an opinion about political issues. Moreover, as they demonstrated in

in From entertainment to citizenship

6 Reading for hemispheric citizenship in Junot Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao In his 1992 Nobel Speech, Saint Lucian poet and Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott theorised Caribbean art as working to achieve the recovery and reconstruction what he called the region’s ‘shattered histories’. As he put it: ‘Antillean art is this restoration of our shattered histories, our shards of vocabulary, our archipelago becoming a synonym for pieces broken off from the original continent.’1 Walcott’s comments on the connections between art and history encapsulate the

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship

7 Male leisure and citizenship in the Second World War I t is perhaps fitting that in a book which considers male leisure and notions of citizenship, the final chapter should investigate the impact of the Second World War on working communities. Never before had the leisure of the working class been so systematically scrutinised by the state through a network of intelligence officers and researchers. The era of total war had propelled the civilian to centre stage and the British Government watched nervously to see how he or she would respond to enemy bombardment

in Leisure, citizenship and working-class men in Britain, 1850–1945
Abstract only

Introduction Supraabove, beyond, in addition (to) (Oxford English Dictionary) Within recent memory the prospect of EU citizenship would have struck most observers as wildly speculative, and the idea of it unintelligible. The very concept of modern citizenship was so inextricably linked with that of the nation-state as to appear meaningless when decoupled from it. That nation states were the only possible repositories of citizens’ political attention, activity, and allegiance seemed self-evident. Ideas of global or supranational citizenship were, consequently

in Supranational Citizenship