Author: Tim Allender

This book examines how the identities of women and girls in colonial India were shaped by interaction with each other, a masculine raj and feminist and non-feminist philanthropists situated mostly outside India. These identities were determined by the emotional and sexual needs of men, racial hybridity, mission and religious orders, European accomplishments mentalities, restricted teacher professionalism and far more expansive medical care interaction. This powerful vista is viewed mostly through the imagery of feminine sensibility rather than feminism as the most consistent but changing terrain of self-actualisation and dispute over the long time period of the book. National, international and colonial networks of interaction could build vibrant colonial, female identities, while just as easily creating dystopias of female exploitation and abuse. These networks were different in each period under study in the book, emerging and withering away as the interplay of state imperatives and female domesticity, professionalism and piety changed over time. Based on extensive archival work in many countries, the book provides important context for studies of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century colonial women in many colonial domains. The book also explains why colonial mentalities regarding females in India were so different to those on the nationalist side of the story in the early twentieth-century. This was even when feminist discourse was offered by a failing raj to claim new modernity after World War One and when key women activists in India chose, instead, to cross over to occupy spaces of Indian asceticism and community living.

Author: Sara Mills

This book is an analysis of the complex links between social relations—including notions of class, nationality and gender—and spatial relations, landscape, architecture and topography—in post-colonial contexts. Arguing against the psychoanalytic focus of much current post-colonial theory, it aims to set out in a new direction, drawing on a wide range of literary and non-literary texts to develop a more materialist approach. The book foregrounds gender in this field where it has often been marginalised by the critical orthodoxies, demonstrating its importance not only in spatial theorising in general, but in the post-colonial theorising of space in particular. Concentrating on the period of ‘high’ British colonialism at the close of the nineteenth century, it examines a range of colonial contexts, such as India, Africa, America, Canada, Australia and Britain, illustrating how relations must be analysed for the way in which different colonial contexts define and constitute each other.

The morphogenesis of an African regional capital
Liora Bigon

This book deals with the planning culture and architectural endeavours that shaped the model space of French colonial Dakar, a prominent city in West Africa. With a focus on the period from the establishment of the city in the mid-nineteenth century until the interwar years, our involvement with the design of Dakar as a regional capital reveals a multiplicity of ‘top

in French colonial Dakar
The problem of nomadism in German South West Africa
John K. Noyes

theoretical challenge to the history and geography of the nation-state. In this chapter, I aim to show how the issue of nomadism in colonial Namibia in the late nineteenth century was used to construct a specific relationship between subjectivity and landscape that could solve both the theoretical and practical challenges to the national development of territory. I will begin by

in Colonial frontiers
Sara Mills

Subjectivity and spatiality The link between colonial subjectivity and spatial relations is relatively under-investigated and in this chapter I examine the way that spatial relations often determine and impact on the construction of colonial identities, and how subjectivities play a role in the construction and contesting of spatiality. Subjectivity has been analysed largely from the perspective of psychoanalysis and, because psychoanalysis is not able to analyse the historical specificity of the social and

in Gender and colonial space
Sara Mills

This chapter analyses the specificity of colonial public and domestic architecture and focuses on the way that these forms of architecture developed out of a complex relationship with both metropolitan and indigenous styles of architecture. These new forms of architecture were both a reflection of and embodiment of cultural norms at a stereotypical level – how the British would like to be perceived, how they wanted their rule and their colonising to be seen. Whilst public colonial architectural space has been analysed in some detail

in Gender and colonial space
Sara Mills

In an uncanny Australia, one’s place is always already another’s place and the issue of possession is never complete, never entirely settled. (Gelder and Jacobs, 1998: 138) When colonial space is generally discussed, very often it is the perspective of the coloniser and imperialist that is adopted, and in some senses this book is no exception. In focusing on gender, there may be a sense in which we necessarily, even if unintentionally, downplay other perspectives. McEwan asks, ‘Is it possible to recover the

in Gender and colonial space
Dakar between garden city and cité-jardin
Liora Bigon

comes next only adds to the confusion: ‘When we move out of the realm of practical application toward the germ of the idea itself, the likelihood of distortion is nearly as great.’ Written more than forty-five years ago, Creese’s description of the semantic and practical confusions of the garden city idea is particularly applicable to the history of colonial

in Garden cities and colonial planning

During the Second World War, over 9,000 men from several colonies, protectorates and mandate territories fought for the British Empire. These forces represented a significant shift in naval policy towards the recruitment of colonial manpower at a time of distinct pressures on British imperialism. This book examines the impact of colonial naval forces, by analyzing the 'official' and 'subaltern' sources in the United Kingdom, the Caribbean, East Africa, Southeast Asia and Hong Kong. The Trinidad Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (TRNVR) was formed to defend the island's oil supply to British oil-fired ships. The book also looks at the experience of the Cayman Islanders who volunteered to serve in the TRNVR. An East African case study focuses on Kenya and Zanzibar before and after the Second World War. The Kenya Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (KRNVR) was the first colonial naval force in the British Empire; local naval forces were also formed in Zanzibar and Tanganyika. In the analysis of Southeast Asia and the Malacca Straits, the book discusses, inter alia, origins of Malaya's naval forces, and analyses the issues of force expansion and 'Malaysianisation' during the Malayan Emergency and decolonisation. There was an initial reluctance on the Navy to recruit the Chinese, but with their overwhelming majority in Hong Kong, their enlistment in the Hong Kong Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (HKRNVR) was unavoidable. The post-war evolution of Hong Kong's naval force as it adjusted to the roles of Communist China's emergence and Britain's declining world are also examined.

Segregationist insights
Liora Bigon

Introduction The establishment of Dakar as a colonial, imperial and federal capital city both in French sub-Saharan Africa and in the French colonial imagination was no different from any other colonial city in Africa, and beyond in terms of segregationist thinking. As in fact was clear from every monograph on any contemporary colonial city, the planning of residential

in French colonial Dakar