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Eglantine Staunton

This chapter investigates France's conception of, and contribution to, human protection from 1987 to 1993. This period is particularly interesting because on the one hand, it corresponds to the emergence of France's domestic norm of human protection during François Mitterrand's presidency (1981–95), and on the other, it witnessed the emergence of the international principle that was humanitarian intervention. 1 Consequently, it allows the analysis of both processes and their interplay in order

in France, humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect
Eglantine Staunton

The period 1994–99 constituted a challenging time for humanitarian intervention, as it faced strong international criticism before being contested by the end of the decade. In France, François Mitterrand completed his presidency and was replaced by President Jacques Chirac, whose first mandate lasted from 1995 to 2002. Both Mitterrand and Chirac had to work with governments from the opposite end of the political spectrum: the first cohabitation took place from 1993 to 1995 and forced left-wing President Mitterrand to work with a right

in France, humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect
Abstract only
Andrew Smith and Anna Barton

series, also titled ‘Interventions: Rethinking the Nineteenth Century’, published by Manchester University Press. This series (also edited by us) aims to provide a space in which scholars can reflect on the nature, scope, and direction of nineteenth-century studies. Whilst wishing to support ongoing research into the period it also aims to foster unorthodox approaches to the nineteenth century which challenge and problematise conventional models of the Victorians and to that end it engages with a notion of the long nineteenth century

in Interventions
The material production of American literature in nineteenth-century Britain
Katie McGettigan

‘domestic’ by echoing the symbolic domestic spaces in The Guardian Angel itself, within discussions of American literature being circulated abroad. Holmes’s letter suggests that a British edition of an American book might construct an American space outside of the nation itself, and that these American books could create transatlantic communication. Holmes perceives the interventions of British publishers as antithetical to this aim; this chapter, however, argues the opposite. It suggests the material interventions of

in Interventions
Having one’s cake and eating it too
Marie-Luise Kohlke

’s subtle contemporaneousness , helping to explain the Victorians’ conversion into such hypocritical embodiments of all-consuming western cultural imperialism and dreams of world domination run amok. Wanting was written at a time of high profile public debates about the legitimacy and efficacy of the US-led NATO military intervention in Afghanistan combatting what might be termed the ‘terrorist desires’ of armed non-state organisations such as the Taliban and al-Qaeda to contest western ideology and geopolitical spheres

in Interventions
Anna Barton

because it might contribute to a reassessment of the relationship between Romanticism and Victorianism, but also because of its implications for methodological divisions between (new) historicist and (new) formalist approaches to the poetry of both periods. This division is described by Marjorie Levinson as the ‘dual commitment of materialist critique’, taking ‘materialist’ to mean both ‘an intervention practice taking the general form of ideology critique’ and ‘an attachment to effects that resist re

in Interventions
Liberalism and liberalisation in the niche of nature, culture, and technology
Regenia Gagnier

limits and contingency of one’s own perspective. This chapter will consider some implications for Victorian Studies suggested by recent developments in the fields of world literatures and globalisation studies. It will draw attention to the global scope of Victorian literature as an actant in world affairs, as in processes of liberalisation, democratisation, and trade, but also to the specificity of each local environment and moment of transculturation. It hopes to make a methodological intervention on behalf of

in Interventions
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Writing popular culture in colonial Punjab, 1885– 1905
Churnjeet Mahn

fairy tales. Despite her literary intervention Steel styles herself as a collector rather than translator of the tales: That is neither a transliteration–which would have needed a whole dictionary to be intelligible–nor a version orientalised to suit English tastes. It is an attempt to translate one colloquialism by another, and thus to preserve the aroma of rough ready wit existing side by side with that perfume of pure poesy which every now and again contrasts so strangely with the other

in Interventions
Norman Geras

04 Crimes Against Humanity 098-112 3/12/10 10:11 Page 98 4 Humanitarian intervention We have seen in the preceding chapters that the concept of crimes against humanity implies a limit to state sovereignty. It is natural, therefore, that discussion of the concept, and especially of its beginnings, should make reference to an earlier tradition within international law to which that same limit is germane – I mean the tradition of humanitarian intervention. In fact, the principle of humanitarian intervention stands not only at the origin of the offence of

in Crimes against humanity
Bernhard Zeller, Charles West, Francesca Tinti, Marco Stoffella, Nicolas Schroeder, Carine van Rhijn, Steffen Patzold, Thomas Kohl, Wendy Davies and Miriam Czock

External interventions in local society took place in very different ways in early medieval Europe. Their intensity depended, to a large degree, on the extent of claims made by central authorities and other powers, such as lay aristocrats or heads of religious institutions. In the early ninth century, for example, Frankish rulers of the Carolingian family attempted to control everyday life even within local society – a remarkable and far-reaching intention. The new norms written down for this purpose in capitularies, conciliar records and episcopal statutes are

in Neighbours and strangers