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‘Passing’ fads?: recent controversies of authenticity and authorship

I feel that none of the slight liberties I took in writing my memoir really affect the overall work, but nonetheless, you should know a few things: I am not, in fact, black. Nor am I, to the best of my knowledge, a woman. Anything in my book that suggests otherwise is the result of a typographical error. That this error was compounded by my decision to pose for my author photo and bookstore appearances in drag and blackface is, I will acknowledge, unfortunate. The portions of my book

in Passing into the present

Lady Anne Clifford was Countess of Pembroke, Dorset and Montgomery by marriage, and by birth Baroness Clifford. Anne began her life with the expectation that she would live the typical and prescribed life of a seventeenth-century aristocratic woman - marrying into an important family. With the death of her brother Robert in 1591, the one-year-old Anne became sole heir of the vast Clifford hereditary estates in Westmorland and north-west Yorkshire. However, her status as heir was soon compromised by her father, who began legal manoeuvres to place his own brother Francis as heir. This and George Clifford's infidelities led to great strains in his marriage to Margaret Russell, which Anne describes in detail in the 1603 Memoir. George Clifford died in 1605 and by his will left some hereditary estates to his brother Francis Clifford. The will stipulated that, should his brother leave no direct male heirs, his daughter Anne would inherit these estates. Margaret Russell refused to accept the will and this ignited an inheritance dispute that would last for decades, with repercussions that rumbled on for over a century. Anne's mother led the battle to regain her daughter's inheritance in the early years of the lawsuit. Anne Clifford lived during the reigns of four monarchs and two heads of state in her long life of eighty-six years. She experienced exile and isolation as well as great political power. Anne Clifford's surviving autobiographical writing reveals her deep commitment to maintaining a record or account of her life.

Open Access (free)
Writing home in recent Irish memoirs and autobiographies (John McGahern’s Memoir, Hugo Hamilton’s The Speckled People, Seamus Deane’s Reading in the Dark and John Walsh’s The Falling Angels)

9780719075636_4_013.qxd 16/2/09 9:29 AM Page 232 13 ‘Sacred spaces’: writing home in recent Irish memoirs and autobiographies (John McGahern’s Memoir, Hugo Hamilton’s The Speckled People, Seamus Deane’s Reading in the Dark and John Walsh’s The Falling Angels) Stephen Regan One of the familiar conventions of autobiography is its revelation of an individual life through a compelling first-person narrative voice. To work upon its readers most effectively, autobiography needs to present the life in question as both unique and typical; it must offer an appealing

in Irish literature since 1990
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Testimony, memoir and the work of reconciliation

restitution in the courts and legislatures (such as land rights and financial payments for damages and restitution). This chapter is concerned with the personal dimensions of the reconciliation movement and has a specific interest in the ways that testimony and memoir have become vehicles for the individual and personal experiences of reconciliation in a process of interracial dialogue. These autobiographical engagements have been one of the most visible engagements with the legacies of settler colonialism in Canada and Australia in the

in Rethinking settler colonialism
Some British political and military memoirs of the Troubles

continued attention to Northern Ireland affairs is obvious. One particularly fruitful area of academic study is the memoir literature that the years of conflict generated. There have been many memoirs written by British politicians from both the Conservative and Labour parties that discuss their involvement in DAWSON 9780719096310 PRINT (v2).indd 21 14/10/2016 12:19 22 Perspectives from the British State Northern Ireland affairs. Inevitably, these are self-serving to say the least, but nevertheless they are useful for the insight they provide into the way that these

in The Northern Ireland Troubles in Britain
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Jessica L. Malay

vast Clifford hereditary estates in Westmorland and north-west Yorkshire. However, her status as heir was soon compromised by her father, who began legal manoeuvres to place his own brother Francis as heir.2 This and George Clifford’s infidelities led to great strains in his marriage to Margaret Russell, which Anne describes in detail in the 1603 Memoir. In this early part of Anne’s life she lived as a fledgling courtier, often sleeping near Queen Elizabeth in her aunt Anne Russell’s chamber. From this vantage point she witnessed the exercise of political power that

in Anne Clifford’s autobiographical writing, 1590–1676

3 The hell at the heart of paradise Introduction: more writings from L’Hôpital Chirurgical Mobile No. 1 Mary Borden published The Forbidden Zone in 1929, more than ten years after the armistice.1 Long before this  – indeed, even before the war itself had ended  – Agnes Warner’s My Beloved Poilus had appeared in her home town of Saint John, New Brunswick.2 But it was one of Borden’s trained nurses, Ellen La Motte, who produced the earliest memoir of L’Hôpital Chirurgical Mobile No. 1. The Backwash of War was published by Putnam’s in New York in 1916.3 The book

in Nurse Writers of the Great War

brand names’ in academia, locating Kingston along with the likes of Chaucer, Milton and Shakespeare. 5 Much of the critical debate surrounding Warrior has centred upon the book’s troubling generic status. Ostensibly a memoir – the subtitle is ‘Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts’ – the book won the National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction, but it blends together elements of several genres, including fiction, myth, auto/biography and memoir, in a manner that is not easily categorised. The Woman Warrior’s critical controversy

in Maxine Hong Kingston
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to take England’s side against any criticism (especially, perhaps, by an American). But not so long ago I put quite a bit of energy into my own demonising of England – the other side of my idealising of ‘America’, perhaps. In 1976, my father wrote a short memoir of his own, reflecting on his experiences in Germany in the 1930s, recording the increasing processes of Aryanisation that he confronted in his work as a chemist, and the growing isolation in his everyday life. Towards the end, he expresses his gratitude to Britain: 80 Atlantic moves It is too often

in Writing otherwise
Cross Channel and The Lemon Table

treats in fictional form issues raised by his later memoir Nothing to Be Frightened of. Cross Channel assembles stories of the British and Irish in France across modern history. Its closing story ‘Tunnel’ concludes by explaining that all the stories have been written by an ‘elderly Englishman’ who has returned from France on the Eurotunnel train in 2015. This writer stands as a surrogate for the older Barnes, an author who has apparently taken elements of his train journey as imaginative platforms on which to develop the earlier stories

in Julian Barnes