3 Passionate performances – Poems erotic and divine for I Except you’enthrall mee, never shall be free, Nor ever chast, except you ravish mee. (‘Batter my heart’, ll. 12–14) Whereas Donne’s erotic poems are much indebted to religious metaphor, his nineteen ‘Holy Sonnets’ strongly rely on erotic imagery. After an analysis of Donne’s religiously erotic poems, these are now to be compared to his erotically religious poetry. As it engages in a histrionics of love making, Donne’s erotic poetry conceives of love as a matter of (artful) performance, hence subscribing

in John Donne’s Performances
Gladstone, the National Theatre and contested didactics of the stage

5 Performance for imagined ­communities: Gladstone, the National Theatre and contested didactics of the stage Anselm Heinrich O ne of William Gladstone’s most lasting visions for British society was one of social cohesion, and the ‘working man’ played an important part in this. For Gladstone this did not include upward social mobility but it did mean a vision of the working man wishing to improve – ‘to improve his mind, to improve his income and to improve his skills, in roughly equal measure’.1 The working man would still remain a working man – Gladstone did

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To explore comedy performance is to acknowledge that there is something that defines a performance as ‘comic’; that is, that comedy performance is of a particular type which is distinct from other, more serious and/ or tragic texts. Furthermore, it is to acknowledge that comedy performance requires being read as such in order for its aims to be achieved; that is, comic acting must not only be funny

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The political campaigns of early labour leader

13 Class, performance and socialist politics: the political campaigns of early labour leaders Marcus Morris T he political world of late Victorian Britain was in many ways a dramatic show, with politicians’ campaign performances appealing to a disparate audience. Many politicians conceptualised themselves as performers, including labour and socialist politicians, who are the focus of this chapter. They deliberately sought character types and roles for themselves to play, often along class lines. The use of theatrical techniques, including the manipulation of

in Politics, performance and popular culture

2 Promethean and protean performances – Worldly poems And by these hymnes, all shall approve Us Canoniz’d for Love. (‘The Canonization’, ll. 35–6) Despite almost two hundred years of critical neglect, Donne is nowadays thoroughly ‘Canoniz’d’. His popularity results from his erotic and devotional poetry, but it is the interrelationship between the two genres that makes for Donne’s idiosyncrasy. Hence ‘hymnes’ are to bring about ‘The Canonization’ of two not merely spiritual lovers, who ‘dye and rise the same’ (l. 26). While this may be read as a reference to

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organs and skeletal structure, until all that is left is the indented outline of Bacon’s body on the soft foam cover of the gurney. The drama of this scene is accentuated as Bacon violently jerks and rolls his body to reveal the pain and agony of Sebastian’s transformation and the surrounding team react with shock and amazement. In a somewhat playful twist, as Sebastian disappears from the screen Bacon’s performance in this role

in Genre and performance

2 Performance and gesture as crisis in La aldea maldita/​The Cursed Village (Florián Rey, 1930) Sarah Wright1 Film acting has come to be understood as the production of ‘communicative signs that conceal their own ostensiveness under the guise of quotidian behaviour’ (Swender 2006:  7). As David Mayer similarly notes, ‘we expect that a cinema actor, with facial nuances, small suggestive gestures, and vocal modulations such as those we might use in our daily lives, will try to confirm the corporeality and actuality of the environment he or she inhabits’ (1999:  10

in Performance and Spanish film

5 (Inter)Personal performances – Devotions therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee. (Devotions 87) This chapter centres on Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, a work originating from an illness during which Donne considered himself on the verge of death, and one of the few writings he published. There are important points of contact between epistolary and devotional modes: as the post-Reformation period witnessed shifts in devotional practices and a new interest in the self, these changes had consequences for early modern

in John Donne’s Performances
The 1889 dock strike on and off the stage

12 The performance of protest: the 1889 dock strike on and off the stage Janice Norwood T he late 1880s are characterised as the era of ‘New Unionism’ as workers from various trades and industries banded together to demand higher wages and better working conditions against a background of growing socialist feeling. In Parliament a Select Committee of the House of Lords published five reports (1887–90) on the sweating system, a practice that was widely believed to exploit workers and lead to poverty. The East End of London was home to the most notorious of the

in Politics, performance and popular culture

PART II Politics in performance O ne of the continuing appeals of popular theatre, in particular pantomime and melodrama, was topical referencing, allusions to people and events in the news, the latest fads and fashions, popular products and venues, scandals and sensations. But the producers and writers of stage works had to be careful not to invite interference from the censors. From 1737 to 1968 the stage functioned under the oversight of the Lord Chamberlain’s office and had to conform to a strict set of regulations designed to preserve moral standards and

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