Diana Cullell

The power of poetry written by women Cullell_ContempPoetry_02_Poems.indd 65 28/04/2014 17:24 Cullell_ContempPoetry_02_Poems.indd 66 28/04/2014 17:24 ANA ROSSETTI Chico Wrangler Dulce corazón mío de súbito asaltado. Todo por adorar más de lo permisible. Todo porque un cigarro se asienta en una boca y en sus jugosas sedas se humedece. Porque una camiseta incitante señala de su pecho, el escudo durísimo, y un vigoroso brazo de la mínima manga sobresale. Todo porque unas piernas, unas perfectas piernas, dentro del más ceñido pantalón, frente a mí se separan. Se

in Spanish contemporary poetry
Diana Cullell

Poetry of experience and poetry of difference (late 1980s–1990s) Following the idea that trends in literature can often swing like a pendu­­ lum, the dominant poetry from the end of the 1980s throughout the next decade can be characterised as a departure from that of the 1970s, offering a major shift in the register, traditions, language, style and topics employed by the poets of that period. The poetic ambience in Spain in the 1990s, however, is also renowned for the poetic conflicts, the so-called ‘batallas poéticas’, that were staged between the dominant trend

in Spanish contemporary poetry
Spolia in Old English verse

Borrowed objects and the art of poetry examines seven Exeter riddles, three Anglo-Saxon biblical poems (Exodus, Andreas, Judith), and Beowulf to uncover the poetics of spolia, an imaginative use of fictional recycled artefacts to create sites of metatextual reflection. Old English poetry famously – and for a corpus rather interested in the enigmatic and the oblique, appropriately – lacks an explicit ars poetica. This book argues that attention to particularly charged moments within texts – especially within texts concerned with translation, transformation, and the layering of various pasts – gives us a previously unrecognised means for theorising Anglo-Saxon poetic creativity. Borrowed objects and the art of poetry works at the intersections of recent interest in materiality and poetics, balancing insights of thing theory, and related approaches with close readings of specific passages from Old English texts.

Pastoral Poetry of the English Renaissance 1 Theocritus Idyll viii Translated anonymously from the Greek From Sixe Idillia ... chosen out of ... Theocritus (1588). This idyll is part of the core Theocritus canon, though scholars have doubted his authorship; some have suggested that the poem amalgamates what were originally separate pieces. The viii. Idillion. Argument Menalcas a Shephearde, and Daphnis a Netehearde, two Sicilian lads, contending who should sing best, pawne their whistles, and choose a Gotehearde, to be their Iudge. Who giueth sentence on Daphnis

in Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance
Diana Cullell

patterns and vocabulary, present alternative and parallel universes that nonetheless bear strong cultural references. This becomes just another expression of hedonism and lifestyle, as well as a group of voices articulating socio-historical concerns, extraordinarily important for the period, and one that can successfully document some of its social and historical developments. The power of poetry written by women (1980s–early 1990s) Although Nueve novísimos poetas españoles included only one woman poet (Ana María Moix) amongst the authors anthologised, the trend

in Spanish contemporary poetry
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4 Poetry’s defences I In Chapter 3, I argued that it was only through an examination of rhetoric and poetics that we could avoid leaving the crucial systemic place of the aesthetic as an open or empty category. Any articulation of an early modernity, I proposed, found itself imbricated within the systemic ambitions of philosophical modernity. This discussion was guided by an emphasis on the notion of the aesthetic in broad terms, that is, on a generalised sense of art that went beyond modern conceptions of ‘literature’. In part, this was led by a historical

in The sense of early modern writing
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2 The poetry Although Malouf’s international reputation is very much founded on his achievements in fiction, he began as a poet and was nearly two decades into his career before publishing his first substantial fiction. In his Preface to Johnno, Malouf offers some brief analysis of the creative process, in some aspects very practical, that initiated and sustained his first novel’s composition. Forging the crucial first sentence of what will become the first novel entailed ‘falling back on the open, undefended tone of poems … written a decade before’. Further

in David Malouf
Open Access (free)
Stirner, anarchy, subjectivity and the art of living

3 John Moore Lived poetry: Stirner, anarchy, subjectivity and the art of living1 Introduction At the heart of the new anarchism(s) there lies a concern with developing a whole new way of being in and acting upon the world.2 Contemporary revolutionary anarchism is not merely interested in effecting changes in socioeconomic relations or dismantling the State, but in developing an entire art of living, which is simultaneously anti-authoritarian, anti-ideological and antipolitical. The development of a distinctively anarchist savoir-vivre is a profoundly

in Changing anarchism
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End-note The poet Lee Harwood, whose ‘Brighton. October’ was considered in Chapter 7, is one of the best performers of poetry I have ever heard. He sometimes uses a ‘break-off ’ ending, in which his reading of a poem seems to stop in mid-air, hanging on a slightly rising inflection of the voice, as if more should follow, with the grammatical sequence suddenly interrupted. So a poem might end ‘It’s so simple, so clean, so …’. There would be a slight pause, and then he would slowly lower the sheet he was reading from, and begin flicking through his folder for the

in Reading poetry
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9.  Poems and pictures This chapter concerns poems which are about an art object. It may be a vase, a piece of sculpture, or, more frequently, a painting or photo­graph, hence the chapter title. This kind of work is now usually called ekphrastic poetry. The word ‘ekphrasis’ is derived from Greek roots, ek, meaning ‘out’, and phrasis, meaning ‘speech’, and hence denotes an act of description, a ‘speaking out’ or speaking plain. It is given to this kind of writing because these poems often begin with something like a description of the object, before going on to

in Reading poetry