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character of transnational religious life’, Sociology of Religion, 65:1, 1–18. Macourt, M. (2011) ‘Mapping the “New Religious Landscape” and the “New Irish”: uses and limitations of the census’, in O. Cosgrove, L. Cox, C. Kuhling and P. Mulholland (eds) Ireland’s New Religious Movements. Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 28–49. Maleševic´, V. and Á. Lioré (2009) ‘GROW-ing neo-secularisation’, Working Paper No. 2, Galway, National University of Ireland Galway. Meyer, K., E. Barker, H.R. Ebaugh and M. Juergensmeyer (2011) ‘Religion in global perspective: SSSR

in Migrations
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population. It is likely that the startling fall in vocations to the priesthood and religious life, and the increasing challenge to the Church’s stances on issues pertaining to human sexuality, were among the main reasons that prompted the Pope to visit Ireland in 1979. Rather than being a triumphalist visit, it was an attempt to lessen the tide of secularism and to re-​energise the faithful. However, in spite of the personal success enjoyed by Pope John Paul II during his time in Ireland, the situation of the Church did not improve in the 1980s and 1990s, which were

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
A time of hope!

had a society steeped in petty snobbery, so that priesthood and religious life easily became a status symbol, while those at the bottom of the pile (the indigent poor, the parentless, farm labourers, petty thieves, etc.) were seen by Church, State and Society as non-​persons –​just numbers. Clerics and religious were all-​powerful. They were above suspicion –​and they knew it. They could act without fear of retribution. Human weaknesses of the flesh –​including machismo and sadism rooted in a frustrated sexuality due to repressive Puritanism and no real vocation or

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism

the services and care that they feel are due to them as citizens); amongst the demos, the general population, who typically want more material goods; and amongst would-be tyrants who ‘want it all’. 128 POLITICAL ECONOMY Pleonexia can be understood in the context of the Greeks’ conception of citizenship as a form of sharing in the political, economic and religious life of the community. Greek citizens perceived themselves as possessing in common all the divisible goods of the community. ‘Justice’ meant to have a ‘just share’ of these goods, that is, to have an

in The domestic, moral and political economies of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland
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Challenges of belonging

network and meet to exchange news from Iraq, relate everyday troubles, laugh and share food together. Sociability was an important motivation for women’s participation. In this way, religious life in Copenhagen serves as a context in which Iraqi women perform many different practices and negotiate a range of identifications and levels of belonging. These women’s religious engagement is also related to their social and gendered positions in Danish society. An important theme throughout the book is 8 Introduction how Iraqi women’s social relations and sense of

in Iraqi women in Denmark
Irish migrants negotiating religious identity in Britain

organisations.28 Hence, it involves something personal and intimate and may be difficult to talk about and verbalise: ‘the unobservable dimensions of religious life have often been given short shrift because the analytical tools we have to study them are undeveloped or undervalued.’29 Levitt argues that in order to understand the role of religion for migrants we must ‘build from the ground up’ by examining how ‘ordinary individuals live their everyday religious lives across borders’.30 Religion may perform many different roles in the migratory experience and, indeed

in Women and Irish diaspora identities
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Doing cosmology and transforming the self the Saiva way

daughter at the age of eleven, although neither is a Sivanadiyar. Ravi told me how, around fifteen years ago, he faced a court case relating to property issues. At this time and although his religious life, like that of most other people, was a mixture of belief and confusion (paadhi nambikkai padhi kozhappam), he began to visit his local Siva temple and then to regularly dream of a particular Siva temple that he had never visited before. When he described this dream to a Sivanadiyar he had met at his local Siva temple, he discovered the name of the temple he had been

in Framing cosmologies

cultural, and rarely goes beyond this. Otherwise, fears of theology take over, and Western philosophies of the ontological, especially phenomenology, may be invoked to sidestep these worries. In his late, great work, The Elementary Forms of 111 Horizons of cosmological wonder Religious Life, Durkheim came to the idea of effervescence to recognise that something critical to human existence is shaped by people together that cannot be reduced to the social (or the cultural), just as the social cannot be reduced to the individual. In my view, this kind of recognition is at

in Framing cosmologies

independent living, there is the Donisthorpe Hall care home providing some 180 beds. In recent times, Donisthorpe has had some serious quality concerns, following critical quality inspection reports. Recovery plans have been put in in place to permit this high-quality care facility to survive and prosper. The religious life of Leeds is sustained by four main synagogues, all conveniently located within walking distance (an important aspect of Sabbath observance) of the main areas of Jewish residence. One synagogue supports a Jewish bakery, while

in Leeds and its Jewish Community
Negotiating community

salient point that the above-cited studies (with the exception of Al-Ali) all discuss the performance of Muharram in southern Iraq and in the historically important shrine cities of Najaf and Karbala. In other areas such as Baghdad or northern parts of Iraq, Muharram was not commemorated to the same extent, just as Shi‘a religious life was generally less intense there than in southern Iraq (cf. Nakash 1994: 97). Rather than calling Umm Ali’s commemoration of Muharram a specific Iraqi tradition, it would therefore be more appropriate to call it a tradition that relates

in Iraqi women in Denmark