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This chapter contains the translated text ofDe divortio. It has several underlying sections, responding to the questions that Hincmar initially received. These sections were, however, further divided to make the twenty-three responses which appear in the manuscript. The original sections are as follows: the procedure at the councils of Aachen, rules on marriage, divorce and remarriage, the validity of ordeals, the next steps in Theutberga's case, the sodomy charge, Lothar's relationship with Waldrada and sorcery, Lothar's possibilities of remarriage, and the response of bishops towards appeals to them and the case of Engeltrude. De divortio also deals with seven further questions which Hincmar received six months after the first: who is able to judge the king, can the king avoid further judgement in the case, the case of Engeltrude, and the effects of communion with the king.

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga

Lotharingians, 190 at the instigation of a demon, took the monastic vows in Gorze. After a few days, however, when the demon that had deluded him had made its identity known, he abandoned the habit of the religious life, in which the angel of Satan had transformed himself into an angel of light , 191 and, like a deserter of God and a renegade, took back his wife 192 and his possessions

in The Annals of Lampert of Hersfeld
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other; the noble household had its round of services in the chapel, and a noblewoman, if she chose, could live a religious life and remain in the world, while secular concerns inevitably impinged on life in the nunnery. There is copious evidence for women’s involvement in religion, notably in charters and wills, but also in didactic treatises, devotional literature, household accounts and episcopal visitations

in Women of the English Nobility and Gentry, 1066-1500
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patronesses of the religious life. Other nobles, both male and female, dedicated themselves to prayer and spiritual improvement in a monastic community, while others walked a middle course between the lay and religious spheres as influential prelates who oversaw both their Christian flocks and their churches’ extensive political and territorial interests. Regardless of which roles individual noblemen and

in Noble Society

they were able to resist him neither in one place nor another. When they fled, they lost both their own land and what they had acquired, and they ended their lives in foreign lands, as they deserved. From now on the church of St Clement could concentrate on the religious life in [a time of] abundant peace; its temporal property was increased by the care of a good shepherd, who watched out every day to advantage the flock which

in Roger II and the creation of the Kingdom of Sicily
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John H. Arnold and Peter Biller

below. They are discussed in P. Biller, ‘Northern Cathars and higher learning’, in P. Biller and [R.]B. Dobson, eds, The Medieval Church: Universities, Heresy and the Religious Life. Essays in Honour of Gordon Leff , Studies in Church History Subsidia 11 (Woodbridge, 1999), pp. 25–53. On William, see S.E. Young, Scholarly Community at the Early University of Paris: Theologians, Education and Society, 1215–1248 (Cambridge, 2014), chapter 3 and pp. 222–3. We have translated from William of Auxerre, Summa aurea , ed. J

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300

suitable price. Indeed, we put all of this together in writing, so that we may offer it to those wanting to taste the honeycomb amassed by our most prudent bee. And so, he was inflamed by such a great desire for the religious life that there was almost no monastic order considered acceptable in his days and territories, from which he did not continually receive pious men. He entrusted to these men the leadership

in Noble Society
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John H. Arnold and Peter Biller

. Despy, ‘Les débuts de l’inquisition dans les anciens Pay-Bas au XIIIe siècle’, in G. Cambier, ed., Problèmes de l’histoire du Christianisme. Hommage à Jean Hadot (Brussels, 1980), pp. 71–104; P. Biller, ‘Northern Cathars and higher learning’, in P. Biller and [R.]B. Dobson, eds, The Medieval Church: Universities, Heresy and the Religious Life. Essays in Honour of Gordon Leff , Studies in Church History Subsidia 11 (Woodbridge, 1999), pp. 25–53; M. Barber, ‘Northern Catharism’, in M. Frassetto, ed., Heresy

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300

and treading underfoot of religion began and remain to this day. The empress herself, considering these changing fortunes, removed herself to Italy and led a religious life for a considerable time at the monastery which is called Fruttuaria. 168 She died afterwards in Rome and was buried with honour in the church of St Petronilla. The years of Henry IV. 1. 169 The year of the

in Chronicles of the Investiture Contest

. Afterwards Sir Michael de la Pole was made chancellor of England following the removal of the bishop of London. 13 53. The two crusades of 1383, according to Walsingham Walsingham’s account of the impact of these two schemes – the Norwich crusade and John of Gaunt’s crusade against the Castilians 14 – upon the religious life shows how individuals took advantage of the combatants

in The reign of Richard II