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Events in China in the early twenty-first century
Maurice Roche

environment relating to ‘secondary-phase modernisation and post-industrial urban regeneration (Part II). In Part III, in this chapter, and also in the following one, we are particularly concerned about a third vector of secondary-phase social change, namely globalisation, particularly in its complex and differentiating aspects.1 On the one hand, in geopolitical and political-economic terms globalisation is currently operating as a process of differentiation in that it appears to involve the emergence of greater ‘world regionalism’ and a ‘multipolar world order’.2 On the

in Mega-events and social change
Piracy and symbiosis in the cultural industries
Maurice Roche

‘soft’ approaches by the IOC in its efforts to address the problem. Finally, the fourth stage of the discussion returns to consider issues relating to the nature of the current co-existence between television and the internet-based media in the context of the Olympics, and the possibilities for a new symbiosis in this area. 78 Mega-events and media change The internet, cultural industry problems and government policies In Chapter 2 it was useful to be able to set our focus on the media sport and mega-event aspects in a broad context of social change connected with

in Mega-events and social change
Staging spectacles in changing cities
Maurice Roche

mega-events 117 in two stages. Firstly, the discussion is concerned with the nature of the material spectacles connected with mega-events. Secondly, it takes a step back to consider the macro-social changes involved in the long-term modernisation process, which are reflected in cities and thus determine the urban conditions in which mega-events are staged and to which they both respond and contribute. In the first section we begin by recognising and exploring the importance of the ‘material spectacle’ aspect of mega-events throughout their history over the course

in Mega-events and social change
London as an event city and the 2012 Olympics
Maurice Roche

’s leading cities like London and particularly so in city areas like the East End. Various aspects of the London 2012 Olympic event reflected this emergent British identity in which a large proportion of the population, at least superficially, has seemed comfortable with cultural plurality and social change. Arguably these aspects are likely to contribute to the long-term memorability of the event. This is even more the case given the British public’s unexpected and marginal decision in a referendum in 2016 to exit the EU, which promises to usher in a future dominated by

in Mega-events and social change
Olympics and legacies
Maurice Roche

are changes both in social structures and in mega-event policy. The macrostructural social changes include post-industrialisation (requiring cities to reimagine, renew their economies and rebrand themselves), globalisation (increasing intercity competitiveness in relation to the attraction of global capital investment and tourism) and mediatisation (involving technological transformations in media and communications requiring the upgrading of urban infrastructures). The mega-event policy changes, as we have noted in Chapter 4, have been the increasing requirements

in Mega-events and social change
Felix M. Bivens

19 MA in Participation, power and social change at University of Sussex Felix M. Bivens Context The MA in Participation (MAP) had its first intake of students in 2004. MAP is the product of several years of planning and more years of previous work by the Participation, Power and Social Change (PPSC) team at Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex. The roots of PPSC connect to the highly influential work of Robert Chambers in the field of participatory development. In the 1990s, his books, including Whose Reality Counts? Putting the First

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Abstract only
Caitriona Clear

4883 Social Change PT bjl.qxd 1111 2 3 4 15 6 7 8 9 10 1 112 1113 4 5 6 7 8 9 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 40111 13/6/07 11:07 Page 1 Introduction Good social history sees people’s lives ‘from the inside out’, in Henry Glassie’s words,1 evaluating their working lives and social and personal relationships from their standpoint. People do not go about in a permanent state of consciousness of the wider historical trends in which they are playing a part. As well-informed a man as Dr Charles Cameron, leading public health exponent, could scoff, in

in Social change and everyday life in Ireland 1850–1922
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Caitriona Clear

4883 Social Change PT bjl.qxd 13/6/07 11:07 Page 74 5 Marriage Téir abhaile ‘s fan sabhaile mar tá do mhargadh déanta . . . Tá do mhargadh – níl mo mhargadh – tá do mhargadh déanta . . . (Go home and stay at home because your match is made . . . Your match is made – my match is not made – your match is made . . .) (Téir Abhaile, traditional, Donegal) Introduction We are certain of three things about marriage and family in Ireland in the years 1850–1922. The first is that Irish people in general married at a lower rate than the European norm; the second is

in Social change and everyday life in Ireland 1850–1922
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Caitriona Clear

4883 Social Change PT bjl.qxd 13/6/07 11:07 Page 42 3 Education Introduction The French word éducation refers to all aspects of a person’s upbringing, including the formal acquisition of knowledge. The world of schooling in the nineteenth century cannot be understood without appreciating that going to school made up only part of children’ s ‘education’, and whether this was a small or a large part (or no part at all) depended largely on family priorities. Almost all children (except those in rich families) were trained to help around the house, business

in Social change and everyday life in Ireland 1850–1922
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Vagrants and prostitutes
Caitriona Clear

4883 Social Change PT bjl.qxd 1111 2 3 4 15 6 7 8 9 10 1 112 1113 4 5 6 7 8 9 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 40111 13/6/07 11:07 Page 127 8 Extreme poverty: vagrants and prostitutes Vagrants and prostitutes were among those who would have been described as ‘poor’ by everyone, including labourers and casual workers. As targets of repression and recipients of relief, they were in regular contact with government and voluntary agencies of the time. Vagrancy or wandering homelessness in Ireland and in Britain was seen as such an ongoing social

in Social change and everyday life in Ireland 1850–1922