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Catholicism, gender and race in two novels by Louise Erdrich

other theorists, it seems clear to me that within Gender and Sexuality Studies, a hierarchy has been established which accepts that certain manifestations of gender ambiguity are more subversive than others: male-to-female cross-dressing is more subversive than female-to-male transvestism; queer subjects are more subversive than heterosexual subjects. Those who subscribe to such assumptions could learn from the work of a growing body of critics of passing, who recognise the redundancy of the subversive versus complicit debate and wonder what else passing could

in Passing into the present
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Making novel readers

-sexual phenomena in order to contextualise the various forms of cross-dressing and homosexual desire observable in Shakespeare’s play. What the chapter quickly abandons, however, is the intertextual debt the playwright may have owed to an anecdote told by Montaigne,62 an anecdote with which, tellingly, Greenblatt opens the chapter. While admitting that this tale of transvestism figures as ‘one of those shadow stories that haunt the plays’, Greenblatt in his analysis almost entirely shunts aside this literary source. What he rightfully chastises as ‘the textual isolation that is

in Novel horizons

must not read Carey’s book as fact. The site decries the book’s elements of transvestism, Ned Kelly having a child and so on. Details, it claims, that don’t match the ‘true history’! On one level this is missing the point, but on another it is also a rebuttal of the hype that goes behind such a work. The novel is a work of pure advertising. It interweaves the language of Kelly as dictated to Byrne in the Jerilderie Letter – Australia’s manifesto of the oppressed Irishman, declaration of independence and map to the individual–community dichotomies of Australian

in Polysituatedness