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’s Writing (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1997), p. 5. Françoise Lionnet, Postcolonial Representations: Women, Literature, Identity (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1995), in particular pp. 2–4. Lionnet’s relational feminism also bears comparison with Avtar Brah’s feminist ‘politics of intersectionality’. Kadiatu Kanneh, African Identities: Race, Nation and Culture in Ethnography, PanAfricanism and Black Literatures (New York and London: Routledge, 1998), p. 154. See Brah, Cartographies of Diaspora, p. 176; Gayatri Spivak, ‘French feminism in an international

in Stories of women
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Postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame

: Routledge, 1998), pp. 62–4. See Doreen Massey, ‘Imagining globalization’, in Avtar Brah, Mary J. Hickman and Mairtin MacanGhaill (eds), Global Futures: Migration, Environment and Globalization (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1999), pp. 27–44. Françoise Lionnet, Postcolonial Representations: Women, Literature, Identity (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1995), p. 2. As Jon Mee, ‘After midnight: the Indian novel in English of the 80s and 90s’, Postcolonial Studies, 1:1 (April 1998), 127–41, puts it, women writers strive to ‘have their say’ about who constitutes the

in Stories of women
The rise of Nordic Gothic

(eds), The Encyclopedia of the Gothic (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), www.literatureencyclopedia.com ; Y. Leffler, ‘The Devious Landscape in Scandinavian Horror’, in P. M. Mehtonen and M. Savolainen (eds), Gothic Topographies: Language, Nation Building and ‘Race ’ (Surrey, England and Burlington, USA: Ashgate, 2013), pp. 141–52; Y. Leffler, ‘Female Gothic Monsters’, in The History of Nordic Women's Literature, http://nordicwomensliterature.net/article/female-gothic-monsters , Publ. 1 December 2016. About the specific Swedish tradition

in Nordic Gothic
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The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction

, Gothic Ireland , pp. 182–90. Diane Long Hoeveler contested such views, querying attempts to read a Catholic agenda in The children of the abbey and, indeed, in female gothic as a whole; ‘Regina Maria Roche's The children of the abbey : contesting the Catholic presence in female gothic fiction’, Tulsa studies in women's literature , 31.1/2 (2012), 137–58.

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829