Search results

Madame Bovary and Les Misérables in 1934

history and into the core canon For the first time on screen together 49 of French literature, where both are still listed as among the ten or even half-dozen greatest masterpieces in the language. As such, and as different as they may be, they have had a place beside each other in all good French homes; students the country over have read, discussed, and been examined on them. And so when sound film had definitively saturated the country in the early 1930s, these novels imposed themselves as ripe for adaptation. At a moment when Hollywood was running roughshod

in French literature on screen

bond of trust. Flaubert’s novel does precisely this when it implies a relationship of familiarity with its readers (‘it was one of those hats’) but then flouts that relationship by proceeding to describe something utterly unfamiliar and unimaginable. This breaking of trust foreshadows the theme of adultery and is itself, I would suggest, an adulterous moment implanted early in the text: the novel betrays us, as Emma will betray Charles. 34 French literature on screen Madame Bovary is a work which reflects on multiple aspects and practices of fidelity and

in French literature on screen

fine-grained emotional and imaginative lives we live while apparently doing nothing, or nothing of note. Play the songs you heard on February 2, 2013, in the order in which you played them, and you can recreate not just the emotions but the suspense and surprise of emotion as it changes in time. Nothing is lost.4 We can only speculate how Proust might have drawn on this technology to recall the ‘fine-grained emotional and imaginative lives’ associated in the 108 French literature on screen Recherche with Vinteuil’s petite phrase and the petite madeleine cakes

in French literature on screen
One novel, two films

safely married. Section one: authors and narratives Thérèse Desqueyroux – reconciling the unreconcilable Before considering the two film adaptations of François Mauriac’s novel Thérèse Desqueyroux (1927), and because it stands as a fulcrum of so many 184 French literature on screen narrating voices, themselves constructed out of obsession, desire, repression, suffocation, and a sense of futility, it behoves us to lift the layers away one by one, as one would uncover a palimpsest, to understand these meanings, first, before proceeding further. So let us begin. By

in French literature on screen

with ‘the world’ predominates over Benson’s concern with the impact of the loss of faith on Englishness itself. Englishness could be recaptured in a variety of ways, but a world without any divine basis was potentially lost for ever. Conclusion A postmodern reading of the nationalist tendencies of Catholic literature in France and England might see them simply as the stories which the French and English Catholic writers told themselves about the State and the possibility of reclaiming it for Catholicism. Catholic

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Abstract only

This book is based on a paradox and a coincidence. The paradox is that at the end of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a period of profound secularisation in France, there emerged a generation of Catholic writers and intellectuals who were convinced that the rumours about God’s death had been greatly exaggerated. The coincidence is that, in the same period, English literature too saw a significant revival in Catholic writing. In France, the late novels of Joris Karl Huysmans, the plays of Paul Claudel and the religious

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914

The conditions of individual secularisation described in Chapter 1 posed two sets of moral problems for believers in France and England at that time. The first concerns how human behaviour is to be mapped out if belief in God has become deistic or has collapsed into atheism. The second concerns the alternative moral criteria to counter the anthropocentrism transmitted by individual secularisation. These two sets of problems provide vital perspectives from which to read French and English Catholic literature in the late nineteenth and

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914

The aim of this book has been to cast light on the paradox of French Catholic literary resistance to secularisation in the period 1880–1914, and on its coincidental parallels among English Catholic writers of the same period. The task of remapping these writings against an analytical grid of secularisation theory was prompted by the weaknesses which we argued were inherent in approaching these writings simply under the confessional label of ‘Catholic’. This process has meant not discarding the category of Catholic literature, however

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914

individuals together either (in the case of the French) through a conscious and coercive political ideal or (in the case of the English) through a piecemeal attempt to arbitrate divisions (which did not in itself exclude coercion or unity through cultural values). These were the conditions in which French and English Catholic writers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries operated. In view of the pluralisation of alternative value systems, the pressure on belief was great. How in such circumstances was faith to be understood and undertaken within literature

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914

religious individualism and ending in German barbarism. That Protestants were still capable of theocentricity is not a consideration that most French Catholic writers of this generation were inclined to make. The cultural and spiritual threat which the French authors found in Germany is paralleled in Chesterton’s The Victorian Age in Literature . Therein, Chesterton describes an unholy nineteenth-century alliance between the political ‘blood and iron’ of the authoritarian German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, and the scientific ‘blood and bones

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914