This personal account of the Swiss government funded mediation or conflict resolution project (2005–13) was first published in Gulf Charities and Islamic Philanthropy in the ‘Age of Terror’ and Beyond , edited by Robert Lacey and myself (Gerlach Press, 2014). Special attention is given here to the Gulf

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times

Pennsylvania, 2014). My contribution appeared as the opening chapter in a volume published later that year, Understanding Islamic Charities , edited by Jon B. Alterman and Karin von Hippel. It is an overview which I still stand by in 2015 despite all the geopolitical changes since 2007. A theme that occurs elsewhere in this book is the unsatisfactory state of academic

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
The case of post-tsunami reconstruction in Aceh

was extended in September 2014, amid sharp controversy. The main motivation for the article (first published in the online Journal of Humanitarian Assistance ), based on a visit in 2007, was to explore what special contributions Islamic charities can make in majority Muslim countries. As in the case of Mali, the finding was guardedly positive. An

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
A dialogue with Islam as a pattern of conflict resolution and a security approach vis-à-vis Islamism

I N THE CONTEXT of broadening the scope of international relations (IR) and of the related field of security studies in light of the changed international system after the end of the Cold War, Islam and Islamic movements have moved to the fore of this discipline. At the surface it looks as if the study of the ‘geopolitics of Islam and the West’ has taken the place

in Redefining security in the Middle East
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This book is about the securitisation of Islam in the United States from the Bush to the Trump administration. It explores the ways in which the securitisation is legitimised and felt when President George W. Bush, President Barack Obama and even President Donald J. Trump securitise through deception and covert language rather than by mobilising a security grammar of existential threats. This book is also about the consequences of using covert forms of hate speech to securitise minority groups and the ways in which everyday racism is linked to

in The securitisation of Islam

Glynn 08_Tonra 01 19/06/2014 12:55 Page 175 8 Mobilisation through Islam We have become so used to hearing about British Muslim identity and British Muslim politics that it can be difficult to remember that up until the end of the 1980s relatively few people thought in those terms. Of course the growing Muslim populations had generated growing numbers of mosques, but identity was largely associated with a person’s place of origin and ethnic minority politics was increasingly being played out through ethnic groups as well as through mainstream political parties

in Class, ethnicity and religion in the Bengali East End

Thus far, I have concentrated on the CT and counter-radicalisation practices in the US and on the representational aspect of the indirect securitisation of Islam – that is, the discursive dimension of this securitisation – in other words, on practices that can be analysed through language. This chapter adds body to this analysis by exploring the emotional experiences that accompany the indirect securitisation of Islam and the affective process of indirect securitisations more generally. Following the work of social psychologist Margaret

in The securitisation of Islam

States state that ‘Islam is peace’, these words serve the larger Orientalist discourse that views Islam as inherently violent. This chapter explains the relation between reality and language necessary to understand the rest of the book. Knowledge-worlds The conduct of research is significantly affected by the position the researcher adopts in regard to objectivity, subjectivity and intersubjectivity. There are three images of possible worlds, each informed by different epistemological assumptions for explaining human action: the

in The securitisation of Islam
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Introduction While the perspectives presented by the various historical actors in the first three chapters were far from unified, they had certain characteristics in common. Almost all understood Englishness as an ideal and as fundamentally different from and more advanced than Islam and the values, customs and traditions they associated with Muslim societies. This basic

in The harem, slavery and British imperial culture
A war of no compromises and compromises during war

1 Islamism, Zionism and Israel: a war of no compromises and compromises during war Since its inception and through to the present time, one of the appeals of Islamism has been its ability to crystallize complex theological and p ­ olitical ideas into simple and catchy formulae. Accessible to all, these formulae masquerade as clear-cut, unwavering, undeniable truths that are not up for negotiation; their authority originates from divine revelation and is supported by the lessons learned from reality itself. Another appeal of Islamism, particularly from its

in Zionism in Arab discourses