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Historical, geographical and political dynamics
Lee Jarvis and Tim Legrand

Prevention Act 1996, while the UK government hurriedly put in place the Criminal Justice (Terrorism and Conspiracy) Act 1998 after an August 1998 bombing in Omagh that killed twenty-nine people. The post-9/11 landscape of proscription The attacks on 11 September 2001 were a pivotal moment in global counter-terrorism policy generally and proscription specifically. Within weeks of the attacks, the United Nations produced a resolution calling for a global legislative offensive against terrorism, prompting urgent legislative drafting throughout 2002. The European Union

in Banning them, securing us?
Abstract only
Ana E. Juncos

promise of future EU membership – how can we expect it to have an impact further afield, in Eastern Europe, Central Asia, North Africa or the Middle East? If EU member states cannot formulate a common position and act in unison in Bosnia, how can we expect the EU to present a common front regarding other complex international issues? Policy failures such as the Libya crisis in 2011 are a constant

in EU Foreign and Security Policy in Bosnia
Jannika Brostrom

capable of promoting collective security. Indeed, the European Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) was famously criticised over its inaction in Libya with one diplomat declaring ‘The CFSP died in Libya – we just have to pick a sand dune under which we can bury it’. 59 This is not that surprising given the different foreign policy goals being pursued between France and the UK on the one side, and

in Violence and the state
Michael Mulqueen

generations of Irish national security policy managers have sought to severely discourage immigration into Ireland. Strategic factors that have underlined cooperation and immigration control have included the threat of republican irredentism and the Common Travel Area between Ireland and the UK. There is no major point of departure between what this book claims and the findings of other literature in the field

in Re-evaluating Irish national security policy
Active internationalism and ‘credible neutrality’
Christine Agius

criticising South Africa’s apartheid system and was also critical of human rights abuses in Eastern Europe. Perhaps the most noted example is Sweden’s criticism of America during the Vietnam War (what Palme called ‘an abnegation of human dignity’) (1972: 8). Stockholm made clear its difficulties with the USA’s South East Asia policy and the US view of Sweden was that of a ‘troublemaker’, aligned to the peace

in The social construction of Swedish neutrality
Roderick Pace

Illegal immigration Another major security challenge is that posed by illegal immigration. The phenomenon comprises different categories of people requiring responses that straddle traditional security policy divisions. It involves economic refugees and genuine political refugees fleeing instability, mostly from sub-Saharan Africa. Europol claims that organised crime

in The security dimensions of EU enlargement
Michael Mulqueen

Irish move (Author’s contacts, Department of Justice; Collins 2007 ). Significantly, the Irish government’s position was that the new Border Information System would ‘converse’ with that which would operate in Britain; the traditional exchange of information would continue (O’ Halpin 1999). 7 However, this masked an important policy difference between the governments. The UK authorities sought

in Re-evaluating Irish national security policy
Abstract only
Bridge or barrier?
Bill Park

2003, 7 expressing concern about global terrorism, WMD proliferation and the problems generated by failed states, together with the EU’s Neighbourhood Policy, 8 suggest a growing EU interest in active engagement in areas of salience to Ankara, such as the Middle East, North Africa, the Caucasus and the Black Sea region. The emphasis in these initiatives is on multilateral diplomacy and conflict

in The security dimensions of EU enlargement
Abstract only
Mary Venner

. 12 M. Arandarenko and P. Golicin, ‘Serbia’ in B. Deacon and P. Stubbs (eds), Social Policy and International Interventions in South East Europe (Cheltenham, UK; Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar, 2007) 167–86. 13 World Bank, Kosovo: Building Peace through

in Donors, technical assistance and public administration in Kosovo
Sources of parliamentary support and opposition
Lee Jarvis and Tim Legrand

fighting for the rights of the Kurdish people’ (Weir 2006 ), while Jeremy Corbyn drew historical parallel with the UK’s previous tolerance of dissident movements from across the world: it is important that this country does not just automatically proscribe an organisation because Government X, Y or Z has said so. If we did that, our history would be very different. Apartheid South Africa banned the African National Congress, yet the ANC had offices in this country, organised in this country, was completely open in this country, and eventually apartheid fell and

in Banning them, securing us?