In the global race for skilled immigrants, governments compete for workers. In pursuing such individuals, governments may incidentally discriminate on gender grounds. Existing gendered differences in the global labour market related to life course trajectories, pay gaps and occupational specialisation are refracted in skilled immigration selection policies. This book analyses the gendered terrain of skilled immigration policies across 12 countries and 37 skilled immigration visas. It argues that while skilled immigration policies are often gendered, this outcome is not inevitable and that governments possess scope in policy design. Further, the book explains the reasons why governments adopt more or less gender aware skilled immigration policies, drawing attention to the engagement of feminist groups and ethnocultural organisations in the policy process. In doing so, it utilises evidence from 128 elite interviews undertaken with representatives of these organisations, as well as government officials, parliamentarians, trade unions and business associations in Australia and Canada over the period 1988 through to 2013. Presenting the first book-length account of the global race for talent from a gender perspective, Gender, migration and the global race for talent will be read by graduate students, researchers, policy-makers and practitioners in the fields of immigration studies, political science, public policy, sociology, gender studies and Australian and Canadian studies.

Odeas, knowledge and policy change

7 Managing migration in the UK and Spain: ideas, knowledge and policy change This book is, in part, a response to the demand that in order to understand contemporary European policy-making we should look at ‘ideas, knowledge and expertise, rather than pure interest’ (Richardson 2005: 6). By choosing to compare two of the EU’s major labour importers in the twenty-first century it tells us about the contemporary governance of migration in Europe, and seeks to overcome the methodological nationalism often associated with migration research (Wimmer and Schiller

in Managing labour migration in Europe

Migrant geographies and European politics of irregular migration Globalisation is frequently thought to cause an unbounded movement of capital, people, information, culture and goods. However, there is an often neglected flip side to this globalised mobility: the increased international collaboration on border controls aimed at restricting the movements of people who have been forced to migrate because of war, destitution, persecution or environmental reasons. This securitisation of borders constructs categories of included and excluded populations; and the

in Migration into art
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Bacon 06 3/2/06 10:30 AM Page 126 6 Migration This chapter assesses migration policies carried out in Russia in recent years within the framework of the securitisation approach used throughout this book. We argue that according to this framework some areas of migration policy have been successfully securitised. This conclusion is reached through the study of three factors: first, official securitising discourse on migration; second, changes made to the institutional framework regulating migration; and third, a number of important developments in the sphere

in Securitising Russia

2 Labour migration policy theory – the state of the art Introduction What do we know about government policies in Europe over labour migration, and how can we understand the ways they have changed so dramatically in Europe since the late 1990s? This chapter interrogates the literature on policy theory and labour migration, building on various approaches and ideas to develop a novel way of looking at policymaking. The chapter has three main aims: first, to critically examine existing theories of migration policy-making and evaluate their accounts of the policy

in Managing labour migration in Europe
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The place of migration

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:39 Page 228 Conclusion: the place of migration Mary Gilmartin and Allen White In late 2011, the Irish Times began a new initiative called ‘Generation Emigration’. Introducing the initiative, Ciara Kenny wrote that it was aimed at the ‘current generation of mobile Irish citizens’, in the context of a ‘mass exodus’ from Ireland (Kenny, 2011). ‘Generation Emigration’ publishes blog entries and opinion pieces, and hosts discussions and links to features on emigration and to support and information groups. While on one level it

in Migrations

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:39 Page 183 10 A countertopography of migrant experience in Ireland and beyond Deirdre Conlon The political, theoretical, and methodological project I want to advance is one that constructs countertopographies linking different places analytically in order to develop both the contour of common struggles and imagine a different kind of practical response to problems confronting them. Katz (2001a: 722) A countertopography invites geographers and scholars in allied disciplines to develop accounts of particular places and

in Migrations
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Ireland and its relationship with migration

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:38 Page 1 Introduction: Ireland and its relationship with migration Allen White and Mary Gilmartin When the Central Statistics Office (CSO) published its 2010 Population and Migration Estimates in September 2010, showing the highest level of net emigration from Ireland since 1989, the media response followed quickly (CSO, 2010). The Irish Times described emigration as ‘this social and economic scourge that ripped the heart out of communities and stifled development’, adding that it must be ‘confronted and defeated’ (Irish

in Migrations

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:39 Page 55 3 Migrant integration and the ‘network-making power’ of the Irish Catholic Church Breda Gray Introduction In this chapter I discuss the Irish Catholic Church as both a bureaucratic hierarchal institution and transnational network that promotes migrant integration and welfare via ‘network-making power’ (Castells, 2009, 2011). The Catholic Church has always channelled flows of religious values, information and people. However, my focus here is on the network-making power of the Irish Catholic Church in shaping the

in Migrations
Childhood visits to Ireland by the second generation in England

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:38 Page 17 1 Transnational networks across generations: childhood visits to Ireland by the second generation in England Bronwen Walter Introduction The close entanglements of families spread between Ireland and England are often ignored as transnational links, reflecting the hazy understanding of separate states within the ‘British Isles’ especially outside the Irish Republic. But the significance of these ties was demonstrated by the size of return migration of Irish nationals with their British-born children in the Celtic

in Migrations