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Macbeth

, ‘Fantasizing Infanticide: Lady Macbeth and the Murdering Mother in Early Modern England’, College Literature , 32 (2005), pp. 72–91; and Joanna Levin, ‘Lady Macbeth and the Daemonologie of Hysteria’. ELH , 69 (2002), pp. 21–55. 21 Julia Reinhard Lupton, ‘ Macbeth 's Martlets: Shakespearean Phenomenologies of Hospitality’, Criticism , 54 (2012), pp. 365–76 (p. 372). 22 Alvin Kernan, Shakespeare, the King’s Playwright: Theater in the Stuart Court, 1603–1613 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995), p. 77

in The genres of Renaissance tragedy
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memory after it. Derrida will not think of time as implying chronology, because ‘the concept of time, in all its aspects, belongs to metaphysics, and it names the domination of presence’. 6 If the very concept of time is metaphysical, this feeds his critique of Husserl: discussing The Phenomenology of Internal Time Consciousness (lectures given between 1905 and 1910, published by Heidegger in 1928

in On anachronism
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Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids

Spenser, Knapp explains that the ‘central paradox of Christian epistemology’ is ‘that the only path to the invisible truth leads through the visible world’. 50 Knapp discusses Spenser’s Protestant-minded negotiation of this paradox with reference to Marion’s Catholic phenomenology, which claims that invisible truth can be reached through ‘phenomenal lived experience’. 51 Spenser, in Knapp

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Allusion, anti-pastoral, and four centuries of pastoral invitations

appearance, allude back to the earlier work themselves. Thus a reader of Walton might only subsequently come to read the Marlowe–Raleigh poems as well as the classical poems from which they derive. The temporal phenomenology of allusion is complex and sometimes counter-intuitive. 39 Such dense and manifold intertextual echoing, seemingly beyond any conscious authorial control, comes close to the different kind of intertextuality described by Mikhael Bakhtin and Julia Kristeva, referring to the interwoven cultural and linguistic fields out of which texts are woven. See

in Literary and visual Ralegh

Two distinct portraits of a ‘fairy queen’ imply contrary views of human nature and contrary aesthetics. In Spenser’s epic a mystic Gloriana draws noble heroes to realise the twelve virtues, perfecting the soul in Godlikeness. In Shakespeare’s comic stage-play a sensually potent Titania evokes a different fairy realm. Directly experienced, her bodily splendor and witty combative speeches arouse desire not just in the privileged but in rude commoners, who commandeer the play’s most engaging scenes. Instead of vying with Spenser’s elite quests for morality in an intellectual heaven-based allegory, Shakespeare views morality in all social classes, the humbler earthy sort matching the more pretentious. Both are ego-driven yet communally civil. This ironic engagement with Spenser’s ‘supreme fiction’ wondrously expands Shakespeare’s own artistry. Equally polarized are the poets’ views of self-love as a touchstone of human psychology. Like Calvin and Luther, Spenser discredits self-love as shameful, both in monarchs like Lucifera and in louts like Braggadocchio, causing Redcrosse’s wretched fall and Guyon’s helpless faint. In contrast, Shakespeare’s characters, noble and vulgar, show a positive form of self-love if carefully managed, as observed by Aristotle, Aquinas, and Primaudaye.

in Renaissance psychologies