Search results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 23 items for :

  • Manchester Film Studies x
Clear All
Abstract only
The creative nexus

programs and commercials. In doing so it had to avoid offending sectional or regional differences. Forced to find the common denominator among all groups within the United States, radio became the thread that tied together all people. More than print or film, politics or laws, radio united the nation. When by the late 1940s more than 90 per cent of the homes in America had radio receivers, it seems clear that the homogeneous passage of broadcasting was heard and

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60

off from their literary origins to acquire an independent folklore existence. The masked avenger also has a political role to play in that the existence of aristocratic individuals able to right wrongs by their own efforts precludes the need for the masses to take matters into their own hands by way of revolution. It was precisely mass popular revolution in France that caused the evils the Scarlet Pimpernel was called upon to oppose. The second appeal was to

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60
Abstract only

ticket sales.10 Indeed, the Cinematograph Exhibitors’ Association (CEA) noted in its annual report that 1936 had been ‘fortunate from [the exhibitor’s] point of view in the enjoyment of a wet summer which kept attendances normal’. Because hot, dry weather encouraged outdoor activities, rain was the cinema manager’s friend. But in almost the next breath the CEA noted that what precipitation giveth, a precipitous political crisis taketh away: ‘the abdication of the reigning king [on 10 December 1936] … was an event to be remembered, not only for its national importance

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45

Cinematograph Films Act 1938 (the ‘1938 Act’), which was always intended to review the operation of the quota. The study undertaken by the Political and Economic Planning Office (PEP) detailed considerable increases in investment in British film production – from £500,000 in 1927 to £7 million in 1937. 66 The number of British films made annually rose from 34 in 1926 to more than 200 in 1936. 67 Dickinson and Street cite

in From silent screen to multi-screen

. 57 PEP (Political and Economic Planning), The British Film Industry (London: Political and Economic Planning Office, 1952 ). 58 C. Metz, Film Language: A Semiotics of Cinema , trans M. Taylor (New York: Oxford University Press, 1974), p. 93. 59

in From silent screen to multi-screen

to wipe out the Nazis. The follow-up, Tarzan’s Desert Mystery (1943), scripted by Edward T. Lowe, was much less satisfying. Nazi agents seek to dominate an Arab emirate in the Sahara and are tackled by Tarzan. But the political message was diluted, too much footage was devoted to the activities of a travelling female American magician and to Cheeta’s comic capers before the film plunged into absurdity when, seeking for a fever cure in the jungle, Tarzan was

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60
Cinemagoing in the blitz

! (1940) advanced the idea that night after night of air raids would be unable to break the British spirit, so cinemagoing allowed ordinary Britons to make an active contribution to the formation and promotion of a national agenda rather than act as passive recipients of it. 113 114 Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45 In this way, normal, everyday activities were ascribed a degree of political significance that they might otherwise have lacked; in blitzed areas, keeping calm and carrying on was not just a phlegmatic or fatalistic expression, but was

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45

Greene, writing in The Spectator (2 April 1935), mischievously suggested that the film was intended to be a satire on the BBC. In fact it is an invaluable historical record of the life of the BBC in the 1930s, stressing its social, cultural and political inclusiveness and doing so in a wholly engrossing manner. As Rachael Low put it, ‘it has an outstandingly elaborate soundtrack in the group’s new counterpoint style … the camera, cutting and soundtrack keep the

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60

threats to social order in later Victorian and Edwardian society. We catch no glimpses of the white-slavery sensations of the 1880s or of the anarchists or terrorists who disturbed the peace of the closing decades of the century for political reasons … the increasing masses of the unemployed urban slum dwellers, those “dangerous classes” whose revolutionary potential was a persistent source of anxiety in later Victorian London, remain virtually invisible. Instead

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60

public. The villains should avoid sadistic behaviour. Horrific and supernatural effects should be avoided. Political themes were ‘unpopular as well as being occasionally embarrassing’ and should be avoided. A ban on the use of cut-throat razors was added later. 26 The new guidelines meant the elimination of Barton’s girlfriend, Jean Hunter. Barton had his enemies even within the BBC. There were those who thought it too downmarket for such an

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60