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Adventures in reality: why (punk) fanzines matter
Matthew Worley, Keith Gildart, Anna Gough-Yates, Sian Lincoln, Bill Osgerby, Lucy Robinson, John Street and Pete Webb

Introduction: adventures in reality: why (punk) fanzines matter Matthew Worley, Keith Gildart, Anna Gough-Yates, Sian Lincoln, Bill Osgerby, Lucy Robinson, John Street, Pete Webb I’m scribbling this down at work so I can’t let the prose flow but I couldn’t care. There’s only one way to defeat the two evils (boring established groups & straight record shops) and that is to ignore them completely. Tony D., Ripped & Torn, no. 1 (1976) It may seem strange that something so ephemeral should warrant historical attention. Typically made with wilful irreverence and

in Ripped, torn and cut
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Positive punk
Richard Cabut

13 Kick: positive punk Richard Cabut In the autumn of 1982, I was living in a punk squat in New North Road, London, N1, a walk from Old Street, unreconstructed and sort of scary/lairy at that time. On one occasion I was mugged for 26½ pence; all I had in my pocket and pretty much all I had in the world. I was on the dole and spent my time conducting a fruitful lifestyle based on what I described in my fanzine Kick as ‘creativity, individuality and rebellion’.1 Kick 4 had been published at the end of that summer and had attracted a fair amount of attention from

in Ripped, torn and cut
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The role of women in punk fanzine creation
Cazz Blasé

4 Invisible women: the role of women in punk fanzine creation Cazz Blase The role of women and girls in the creation of 1970s punk fanzines is largely unacknowledged. Because this area of punk fanzine research is so underdeveloped, this chapter will be situated within a much longer time period than is usual, beginning both pre-punk and pre-1970s. This is in order to reflect the contribution women have made towards independent printing and publishing from the nineteenth century onwards. There are a number of of key moments of pre-punk agitation in print that have

in Ripped, torn and cut
City Fun and the politics of post-punk
David Wilkinson

5 ‘Pam ponders Paul Morley’s cat’: City Fun and the politics of post-punk David Wilkinson Manchester’s City Fun (1978–83) bears all the hallmarks of punk fanzine media. Early issues in particular feature impulsive anti-authoritarian rants alongside reviews and ruminations on the meaning of punk. City Fun’s often striking covers varied in style, though Dada-indebted collages by Linder Sterling and Jon Savage captured a distinctively post-punk structure of feeling; one riven by the crisis of the political conjuncture, which nevertheless offered glimpses of utopia

in Ripped, torn and cut
Rowland Wymer

King’s Road clothes shop owned by Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood and who embodied the emerging punk style which the shop was busy promoting. She had appeared briefly, with a strikingly anachronistic blonde punk haircut, in the opening scene of Sebastiane as Mammea Morgana, the famous prostitute who ‘has slept her way from Bath to Rome’, and Jarman now wanted to make a semi-documentary film about her and her London

in Derek Jarman
Toxic Grafity’s punk epiphany as subjectivity (re)storying ‘the truth of revolution’ across the lifespan
Mike Diboll

11 ‘Mental liberation issue’: Toxic Grafity’s punk epiphany as subjectivity (re)storying ‘the truth of revolution’ across the lifespan Mike Diboll1 All that follows below is data Alec Grant (2013) What was I thinking when, in the summer of 1980, I subtitled issue 5 of Toxic Grafity the ‘mental liberation issue’?2 As Matt Worley notes, Toxic featured ‘politically charged collage, essays on anarchy and diatribes against state repression’ in which the music coverage was ‘all but subsumed within a series of nihilistic ruminations on the inanity of work, the

in Ripped, torn and cut
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Countercultural and alternative radical publishing in the decade before punk
Jess Baines, Tony Credland and Mark Pawson

-1Doing it ourselves: countercultural and alternative radical publishing in the decade before punk Jess Baines, Tony Credland and Mark Pawson Alternative do-it-yourself (DIY) publishing in the UK is often assumed to have started with photocopiers and punks. However, counterculture and grass-roots movements from the mid-1960s onwards generated an explosion of alternative ‘not for profit’ print and publications, frequently produced by amateurs using basic technologies. Much of this was consciously infused with notions of autonomy and anti-specialism, themes that

in Ripped, torn and cut
Indie pop, fanzines and punk rock
Pete Dales

9 Are you scared to get punky? Indie pop, fanzines and punk rock Pete Dale This chapter will argue that fanzines played a crucial role in the formation of a perceived genre (or, arguably, sub-genre) called, variously, indie pop, cutie, C86, twee, jangle-pop, shambling or anorak. For the purpose of discussion in this chapter, the scene in question is referred to as ‘1980s indie pop’ or just ‘indie pop’. In the twenty-first century, the descriptor ‘indie pop’ is sometimes applied, in vernacular contexts, to post-1980s ‘indie’ music which is qualitatively and

in Ripped, torn and cut
The transgressive zine culture of industrial music in the 1970s and 1980s
Benjamin Bland

8 ‘Don’t do as you’re told, do as you think’: the transgressive zine culture of industrial music in the 1970s and 1980s Benjamin Bland Of all the musical subgenres that emerged in the immediate post-punk era, industrial may be seen as that which most readily transcended the traditional confines of a musical movement. Industrial stood out as a result of its strong focus on aesthetics and ideas, even in a musical landscape that was widely concerned with rejecting tradition and which interpreted ‘punk as an imperative to constant change’.1 S. Alexander Reed

in Ripped, torn and cut
My life in fanzines
Clare Wadd

was always about being part of something. We took the inclusive anyone-can-do-it ethos of punk rock and fanzines into running what was ultimately a very successful record label, and which operated and supported us for eight years. We priced records cheaply, crammed lots of tracks on, didn’t do limited editions or special versions, and exchanged huge numbers of letters with our record-buying public – many of whom also wrote fanzines, ran record labels, were in bands, or otherwise part of this whole thing. The whole point was that there was no divide between us as

in Ripped, torn and cut