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Joseph Hardwick

Seminary. Indeed, much of the imprint that America left on Canadian Anglicanism came about through influences that are hard to detect or isolate. The widespread hostility found in Canadian congregations to such rituals as responding to prayers, kneeling at prayer, church baptisms and the churching of women indicates that the American influence on popular religious belief in Canada remained strong. 69 Senior colonial

in An Anglican British World
Joseph Hardwick

replaced by a church that thought of itself as an English institution that was there to serve the religious needs of a core English community. 14 Evidence to support this claim can be found in both the colonies and back home in the metropole. In England, as the Australian historian Howard Le Couteur has shown, a network of Oxford-educated Anglicans developed the idea that the Church and other English

in An Anglican British World
Joseph Hardwick

Hopes of building a self-sufficient colonial Church were far from being realised at mid-century. The penury of colonial congregations and continuing suspicion of the voluntary system prompted colonial churchmen to look to home for everything from clergy to church bells. Of course, those who wanted colonial transcripts of England’s ‘immemorial customs and ordered social

in An Anglican British World
David Hardiman

Mahasabha tried to whip up a protest against the missionaries in the early 1950s, 26 the local Congress leaders and social workers adopted a generally benign stance towards the Christians. This was a time when the Gandhian influence was still strong amongst many such people, and, following their mentor, the Congress leaders and social workers placed a strong emphasis on religious tolerance. With the

in Missionaries and their medicine
Abstract only
Two places at once
Andrew J. May

the young. But in the midst of the eagerness and excitement of their leave-taking, there was still time for the Welsh congregation to heed that Thomas and Ann Jones were their sacrifice, a sister and a brother, a son and a daughter, surrendered for the sake of something their beliefs had them truly value more highly. ‘Poor Jones’ was their offering. The Jamaica departed the

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Andrew J. May

opened up to foreign missionaries. After centuries of Chinese antipathy towards religious heterodoxy as a threat to social and political stability, the propagation of Christianity in China seemed a real possibility as the British put enormous political and military pressure on the Qing Dynasty. 4 British forces had captured Hong Kong in August 1839, and as Jones

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
David Hardiman

rich. People will come from different countries to reside here. These hills will be walls of the city. There will be big bazaars. There will be only one master of the city, and Dharm [a religious way of life]. On the hill in the middle of the village a house of God will be built with great rejoicings. To teach and reform your children, one master will

in Missionaries and their medicine
The letter and the gift
Andrew J. May

for free in the hands of our readers’. Overjoyed at the fact that some of his scholars had already memorised all of the nine chapters, Lewis took religious inspiration in the precision of their memorising (‘The verses are recited so correctly sometimes, that I can only feel that to some extent they understand the mindset of the holy writers’). From the perspective of the Khasi boys

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Abstract only
Mission medicine and Bhil modernity
David Hardiman

position and lacked, for the most part, coercive powers over the mass of the people. They had no power to carry out, for example, enforced vaccination or inoculation, compulsory checks for epidemic diseases, or programmes to enforce sanitary cleanliness. The only coercive power available to them lay in their ecclesiastical authority over members of their congregation; and this they did deploy, as they ordered Christian

in Missionaries and their medicine
Andrew J. May

The core questions of this book have been to determine something of the nature of British imperialism in the Khasi Hills, and to explore the ways in which the motives and expectations of its various agents were interconnected. As a study of elements of Christian religious belief and practice, the book’s final chapters will use Thomas Jones

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism