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Eric Klingelhofer

The marvelous Priviledge of Brytish Impire … wealth and strength, foreign love and feare, and triumphant fame, the whole world over. John Dee, 1577 1 This chapter examines the role of archaeology in the study of the Elizabethan colonization of southern Ireland. Initial foreign settlement by early modern European states, or by their authorized commercial organizations, are usefully characterized as the ‘proto-colonial phase’ of the epoch of modern colonial imperialism. For European

in Castles and Colonists
Eric Klingelhofer

political and social changes in the last generations of Irish autonomy. It analyzes architectural types and techniques associated with the late Elizabethan colonization of Munster, which may be applicable to early modern Ireland in general. The chapter concludes with a study of the tower-house, which was used widely by both Irish aristocracy and English colonial landowners. A key period in Irish history, the reign of Elizabeth began with a medieval, semi-feudal society and ended with a central state authority and displaced populations. The Privy

in Castles and Colonists
Abstract only
New Place, 1677–1759
Kevin Colls and William Mitchell

the archaeological evidence that was left behind. Who was Sir John Clopton? When Sir Edward Walker died in 1677, New Place and his other estates were left to his daughter Barbara. Her marriage to Sir John Clopton, in 1662, helped to revive his family’s fortunes. The knighthood of Sir John Clopton, which occurred in the same year as his marriage, was probably a result of his new

in Finding Shakespeare’s New Place
Kevin Colls, William Mitchell and Paul Edmondson

life. Art, as Shakespeare bodies it forth on stage in this scene, can be life-giving, as well as socially impressive. Representations of classical figures were also popular in long galleries. A picture of Cleopatra hung in the Long Gallery at Ingatestone Hall in Essex (where the King’s Men performed), along with ‘a picture of Diana, two pictures of a turk (one male and one

in Finding Shakespeare’s New Place
Eric Klingelhofer

Alas all the Castles I have, are built with ayre, thou know’st. Ben Jonson, 1605 1 Ben Jonson’s comedy Eastward Ho reveals how the early seventeenth century still valued castles as important social possessions. The claim by an impecunious Sir Petronell to have a castle and estate, more than his title, attracted the social-climbing daughter of the rich goldsmith Touchstone. For purely military purposes, castles had become obsolete with successful French siege artillery in Normandy and

in Castles and Colonists
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Pavel Drábek and M. A. Katritzky

different sorts of performative manifestations, and by contemplating ( theor-ising ) them, portrays the multiplicity of forms and shapes theatre could assume, before later eras compartmentalised and institutionalised them within specific, fixed architectural and social spaces. Nonetheless, our inclusive notion of theatre is narrowed down by a specific agenda: we study theatre as a connective instrument

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre
Alan Bryson

Lincolnshire. This was a modest increase on what his father and namesake left him in 1507, but included a jointure to his mother Amy (d. after 1527), who was remarried.2 It was enough to ensure the family’s social position within the parish but not John’s own appointment as justice of the peace (JP), with the wider recognition of gentle status that this guaranteed. It was also enough to let him make minor renovations to the Hall in the early 1520s.3 When he died in late January 1528, even though he had employed feoffees to use in an effort to avoid it, all his land held by

in Bess of Hardwick
Natasha Korda

Among the ‘small finds’ unearthed in the Museum of London’s archaeological excavations of the sites upon which early modern English playhouses once stood – theatrical ephemera including fragile filaments of costume-wire, bits of lace and fringe, bent dress-pins, tiny glass beads, scattered hooks, buttons and buckles, shards of ceramic tobacco

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre
Chloe Porter

result, ‘dressing and undressing were social processes that required … other pairs of hands’. 67 The construction of the spectator as a participant in visual and material culture in Henry V therefore draws on processes which would have been familiar to playgoers from the experience of piecing together their own visual appearance, or helping to compose the dress of relatives, friends, masters, mistresses

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Raleigh’s ‘Ocean to Scinthia’, Spenser’s ‘Colin Clouts Come Home Againe’ and The Faerie Queene IV.vii in colonial context
Thomas Herron

Raleigh’s estates in east Cork (Colin Rynne, ‘The Social Archaeology of MUP_Armitage_Ralegh.indd 134 07/10/2013 14:09 Love’s ‘emperye’ 135 ‘Ocean to Scinthia’, ‘strange’ colonial Ireland, like the poem’s ‘new worlds’, does not function merely as an anecdotal backdrop but rather as a fundamental part of its imperial, Petrarchan conceit: like the Queen herself, the country fuels the driving erotic energy of Raleigh’s despairing art. V. Love, war and riches Of the imperial conceits in ‘Ocean’, some refer explicitly to ‘new worlds’ and colonial opportunity there. But

in Literary and visual Ralegh