Sophia Lee’s The Recess (1783–85), the Gothic and history

subjects. Utilising the same means as Reeve, but for entirely different ends, the Gothic enables Lee to enter the forbidden realm of male dominated eighteenth-century historiography. The Recess , the Female Gothic and history Before I focus on Lee’s use of the Gothic to access historical discourse, it is important to emphasise the prominent role of gender

in Sinister histories
Abstract only
Angela Carter and European Gothic

misogynistic, Gothic forms as part of a feminist engagement with the genre, albeit one that does not always fit comfortably into Anglo-American definitions of the ‘female Gothic’ – or the ‘monster’s mother,’ as Ellen Moers describes it ( 1974a ). Writing as a decadent daughter does not, however, mean that Carter is necessarily a daddy’s girl. ‘Notes on the Gothic Mode

in Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers
Abstract only
Gender in the Gothic
Robert Miles

gender as to warrant the terms ‘male’ and ‘femaleGothic. But the critical survival of these generalizations depends on the principle of exception: the terms only maintain their use if they permit the recognition of cross-over and intervention. For instance, there are cross-overs between female writers and male Gothic, or female writers may intervene in female Gothic. This chapter, then, deals directly

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft and the perils of the present

secured her lasting fame. Similarly to her previous work, the past constructed in Radcliffe’s next Female Gothic novel is intertwined with its own historical context. As Ronald Paulson argues, even though the Gothic genre originates from 1764, by ‘the time The Mysteries of Udolpho appeared (1794), the castle, prison, tyrant, and sensitive young girl could no longer be presented naively; they had all

in Sinister histories
The French Revolution, the past and Ann Radcliffe’s The Romance of the Forest (1791)

continually haunt the present and threaten the well-being of her female protagonists. In contrast to The Recess , Radcliffe’s fictions are not written in the first person. However, as this chapter will show, Radcliffe develops the Female Gothic – a form of Gothic fiction pioneered by Lee in The Recess – by focusing on female experience. Her fictions focus on the plight of the heroine and comment on women

in Sinister histories
Ann Radcliffe’s The Italian and Charlotte Dacre’s Zofloya: Or, The Moor
Robert Miles

deeply than anyone else by Ambrosio’s voice readily follows, for it is a fate inscribed within sensibility. The language describing Antonia’s response, with its familiar mix of aweful dilation and pleasure, disconcertingly brings to the fore the masochistic subject-position of the sublime, the basis of the female Gothic sublime. The ‘apparent delight with which we dwell upon objects of pure terror ... is

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange

whose goal is to lay bare the feminist themes that are central to the genre. Principal among these is that representations of father–daughter incest often cause works to be placed in the gendered subgenre of Female Gothic and to be viewed through a lens predicated on this generic division. What frequently stems from this homogenising gesture is a misinterpretation or misrepresentation of the ambition of

in Gothic incest

This book investigates the functioning of Gothic clothing as a discursive mechanism in the production of Gothic bodies. It presents the debates surrounding the fashion for decolletage during and immediately following the French Revolution, linking these discourses with the exposure of women's bodies in Gothic fiction. The popularisation of the chemise-dress by Marie Antoinette, and the subsequent revival of the classical shift by the women of the Directory, inflected the representation of female Gothic bodies in this period with political rhetoric. The book examines the function of clothing in early to mid-Victorian Gothic. It suggests that the Gothic trappings of veil and disguise take on new resonance in the literature of the period, acquiring a material specificity and an association with discourses of secrecy and madness. The book also investigates a nexus of connections between dandies, female-to-male crossdressing, and monstrosity. It then traces the development of the female doppelganger in the twentieth century, according to the ideologies of femininity implicated in contemporary women's magazines such as Cosmopolitan. In a world where women are encouraged to aspire towards an ideal version of themselves, articulated through fashion and lifestyle choices, the 'single' girl is represented as a problematically double entity in Gothic texts. The book examines the revival of Gothic style in the fashions of the 1990s. Gothic fashion is constantly revisited by the trope of the undead, and is continually undergoing a 'revival', despite the fact that according to popular perception it has never really died in the first place.

Open Access (free)
Incest and beyond

scientific insights. The interdisciplinary approach enables readings that expose the ways in which different incestuous relationships engage with eighteenth-century concerns over family, social obligation, individual rights, inheritance laws and desire. The fruits of this broad methodology are evidenced through recent works on the Gothic such as Diana Wallace and Andrew Smith’s The Female Gothic: New

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic

generation to usurp the sexual rights of the younger generation, while the Gothic novel written by women represents incest as a cultural taboo which functions to repress the sexual desires of women’. 14 Mellor’s assessment represents what a large proportion of scholarship on the genre argues: that meanings of incest differ based on their presence in works designated as Male or Female Gothic. Such

in Gothic incest