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The Gothic in Northanger Abbey
Robert Miles

consciously repudiating one genre in favour of another. Romance, but especially Gothic romance, is rejected in favour of the novel. I do not want to argue that against itself Northanger Abbey is caught up by the Gothic’s discursive practices, or that its ability to draw rational circles of exclusion suffers a ‘Gothic’ failure. But I do want to make a case for the lack of clear-cut boundaries. What I find

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft and the perils of the present
Jonathan Dent

. Godwin, (Gothic) romance and reform In their political works, Godwin and Wollstonecraft often strike an optimistic note. For example, in the Rights of Woman , Wollstonecraft reveals that her ideas concerning reform ‘may be termed Utopian dreams’ (121). Godwin draws attention to the injustices of the present in Political Justice , but he still believes that ‘[m]‌an is

in Sinister histories
Open Access (free)
Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

a contemptuous buzzword for the kind of cheap, imitative fictions – gothic romances in particular – that, in the minds of critics, threatened to reduce authorship to mere hack-work. 12 As one of Lane's bestselling female authors, Roche often suffered from the blanket condemnation of Minerva Press publications as cultural trash. Fellow Minerva authors, including the Irish writers Captain Thomas Ashe (1770–1835), Eaton Stannard Barrett (1786–1820), Nugent Bell ( fl. 1817), Alice Margaret Ennis ( fl. 1817), Alicia Le Fanu

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Elisabeth Bronfen and Beate Neumeier

major exponent, Mary Julia Young had negotiated the same question, albeit only momentarily and to less critical intent, in Donalda; Or, The Witches of Glenshiel , a two-volume Gothic romance published by J. F. Hughes in London in 1805. Set in Scotland during the reign of King Malcolm, Young’s narrative takes off where Macbeth ends, setting out to supplement

in Gothic Renaissance
Historical romance, biography or Gothic fiction?
John Williams

Gothic romances had designated castles (or their equivalents) as the seat of tyrannical male authority; we do not have to read far into the story of Ivanhoe (1820) before being reminded of this: The kings of the Norman race, and the independent nobles, who followed their example in all acts of tyranny, maintained against this

in European Gothic
Open Access (free)
Location the Irish gothic novel
Christina Morin

and gothic literature. Early works such as Dorothy Blakey's The Minerva Press 1790–1820 (1939) and Montague Summers’ A gothic bibliography (1940) demonstrate the range of literature considered as part of a gothic literary tradition in the advent of scholarly attention to ‘the Gothic novel’. Alongside Deborah McLeod's invaluable Ph.D. thesis on ‘The Minerva Press’ (1997), and Franz Potter's The history of gothic publishing, 1800–1835 (2005), this scholarship uncovers many of the texts that have fallen victim both to Romantic-era disdain for gothic romances and

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Christabel, The Eve of St Agnes and Lamia
Robert Miles

’s representations evade naturalism: its figures are mediated by others’ perceptions. Part of the complexity of the poem arises from the shifts in point of view produced by an unreliable narrator. 14 It is characteristic of Gothic romance to deal in figures rather than characters, cyphers rather than personalities. Christabel gives this a further twist by framing its figures within particular points of

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
Jeffrey Richards

the nineteenth century and from the 1840s onwards May Day festivities were consciously revived in various parts of the country. 47 For all its antiquarian and historical detail, The Lancashire Witches was first and foremost a Gothic Romance. Ainsworth, a Tory, an Anglican and an arch-Romantic, had consciously sought to revive the Gothic novel. He admitted in a preface to Rookwood : Romance, if I am not mistaken, is destined shortly to undergo an important change. Modified by the German and French writers – by

in The Lancashire witches
Elisabeth Bronfen and Beate Neumeier

elements will point to an intersection of particularly sensitive issues, surrounded by fears, but also taking the focus of contemporary thought. Notes 1 On the debate of terminology and the critical history of ‘Gothic novel’ and ‘Gothic romance’, see Williams 2

in Gothic Renaissance
Robert Miles

exculpate itself in just such a way. I do not intend to pursue these psycho-biographical speculations. My point rather is that it is the nature of Gothic romances to raise a question mark about their origins, a gap in their provenance that extends beyond the narrow fissure of ‘is this text history, a veridical narrative?’ to the wider one of discourse, or power. Gothic texts raise the issue of genealogy in a

in Gothic writing 1750–1820