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Ian Campbell

provisions which the Franciscans made for the teaching of humanities, philosophy, and theology to their own novices and perhaps also their patrons’ children in Dublin, Drogheda, Galway, Kilkenny, Kilconnell, Cavan, Cashel, Nenagh, Askeaton, Wexford, Quinn, Enniscorthy, and Multifarnham between the 1620s and 1640s.11 The Jesuits briefly offered something like a university curriculum in Back Lane in Dublin in the late 1620s.12 Rising to the upper levels of the Irish Catholic church was impossible without a thorough education in continental colleges and universities, and the

in Renaissance humanism and ethnicity before race
Ian Campbell

Rinuccini excommunicated the supporters of the Confederation’s truce with Protestant forces in 1648, he sent O’Ferrall and other key servants to Rome to defend his actions. The Capuchin radical excelled at the Curia, quickly securing an appointment as expert witness to the committee of cardinals which governed the Irish Catholic church, the congregation De Propaganda Fide, and then defeating all attempts to have Rinuccini’s sentence of excommunication overturned. When O’Ferrall fell from favour in 1658, he sought shelter under Rinuccini patronage in Florence where he

in Renaissance humanism and ethnicity before race
Political reality and religious principle, 1945–56
Lindsey Earner-Byrne

relation to the health and welfare of Irish mothers. The Irish Catholic Church believed that, as the spiritual leaders, their word should ‘prevail’ in relation to any subject that crossed the line between social and moral welfare. Interestingly, in 1956, when McQuaid was asked by the apostolic nuncio, His Excellency Monsignor Levame, what effect the Health Act had had on the Catholic country, he acknowledged that, as a result of Dr Ryan’s concessions, ‘the crookedness of the measure was made sufficiently straight to avoid further condemnation’.187 McQuaid did not

in Mother and child
Christine Kinealy

hierarchy the descent into violence was a reminder of the anti-clericalism of the original French Revolution and the violence of the 1798 uprising. The events of the early summer of 1848 confirmed the Irish Catholic Church in Ireland in their opposition to an uprising. The precautions being made by the British government in the previous three months now found an important ally in the shape of the Catholic Church. 3313 Repeal and Revolution.qxd:Between Growth&Security.qxd ‘The springtime of the peoples’? 21/4/09 10:07 Page 179 179 Notes 1 Report of John Balfe, March

in Repeal and revolution
Open Access (free)
The clergy and emigration in practice
Sarah Roddy

O’Brien (the daughter of William Smith O’Brien) also failed to capture the Irish Catholic Church’s whole-hearted cooperation. Having interested herself in the plight of ‘unprotected’ single female emigrants – who formed a disproportionately large number of the Irish exodus in the later nineteenth century87 and attracted a good deal of moral panic as a result – O’Brien attempted to persuade the Catholic Church to open a safe boarding house for them at Queenstown. This was to no avail, and she subsequently founded, ran and largely funded the home herself.88 Mindful

in Population, providence and empire
Education, migration and Catholicism in early modern Europe
Liam Chambers

main interconnecting milieux: domestic populations, migrant communities and host constituencies (ecclesiastical, university, municipal and state). The pioneering historians of the late nineteenth century concentrated understandably on one aspect of the colleges’ relationship with their domestic populations: their missionary dimension. Patrick Boyle, for example, argued bluntly that the Irish Catholic Church would have withered and died without the clergy formed in the abroad colleges.161 The reality was, of course, more complex and the manner in which the colleges

in College communities abroad
The 1848-ers overseas
Christine Kinealy

, if the coffin could be displayed in his cathedral. He complied, which was in contrast to the Irish Catholic Church’s condemnation of the Fenian movement by the Catholic hierarchy in Ireland. Thus, in September 1861, MacManus’s casket was laid in the centre of St Patrick’s Cathedral. Following the requiem mass, Hughes made an address ‘on the nature of lawful resistance to the state within the context of Catholic doctrine . . . [His] central purpose was to harmonise MacManus’s actions with Catholic teachings according to the precepts of St Thomas Aquinas. His main

in Repeal and revolution
The pastoral responses of the Irish churches to emigration
Sarah Roddy

Catholic provision of clergy to its emigrants from the corresponding Irish Protestant missions was the significant extent to which the receiving churches and the emigrants themselves directly contributed towards the clergy they asked for, via the half-fee system and foreign collection tours. What the Irish Catholic Church offered its emigrants by way of religious aid, then, was simply personnel, and if anything, financial aid for religious purposes went in the opposite direction. As noted, students of All Hallows bore a considerable financial burden. Most had to find £10

in Population, providence and empire