Maintenant, November 1913–April 1915
Dafydd W. Jones

principle. With this redundancy for entrenched dualisms, Deleuze would argue that we move beyond morality (specifically in the absence of any opposition between good and evil) and towards our own creation of the potential­ ities of what we might become, in the expansion of life beyond already established limits precisely as ethics. Cravan’s own immersion in these opening passages of the article ‘Oscar Wilde est vivant!’ has consistently been overlooked for the wider response that was generated to the article’s nominal object. But before accounting for that, we might

in The fictions of Arthur Cravan
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Sam Rohdie

symetrically from the young wife of the painter and, as he finishes the portrait, brings it and her to life, she, in life, dies. But this ‘life’ is purely fictional, itself only a mirror and this lure and feint is infinite. In the case of the film, that mirror is in the Nana from Renoir and the Nana from Zola and the Anna (Karina) who is the model for the artist (Godard). Her death in the film (a Hawksian death) brings her to life like Stracci’s (and Christ’s) in Pasolini’s comedy, parody, blasphemy, La ricotta (1963). And of course it brings to life Oscar Wilde’s 1891

in Film modernism
Maintenant, April 1912–July 1913
Dafydd W. Jones

-poststructuralist contention. So on 2 April 1912, the citizens of Paris received public notice with the following announcement in Gil Blas – a pale description, it must be said, giving away little and bearing only the most rudimentary resemblance to what was shortly to follow: Now we have a new review, not bulky at eight pages in length, to be published monthly. It is called Maintenant, and has as its sole editor M. Arthur Cravan (pseudonym of the writer and nephew of Oscar Wilde). Maintenant promises to bring us previously unpublished documents.45 With a mastery of understatement, this

in The fictions of Arthur Cravan
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Diane Mason

Marcus, I make reference to Victorian pornography in this book, my work differs inasmuch as the primary focus of my attention is for the most part the erotic content of easily accessible fictional productions by authors such as J.S. Le Fanu, Oscar Wilde and Bram Stoker. I also consider the constructions of both the male and female masturbator within these literary texts. The factor that links my choice of relatively mainstream works is that they all contain elements which modern literary critics would identify as generically Gothic or partaking of a fantasy tradition

in The secret vice
Medicine masculinity, same-sex desire and the Gothic in Teleny
Diane Mason

B est known today for its alleged association with Oscar Wilde, Teleny, or The Reverse of the Medal (1893), is a classic erotic and, in many respects, Gothic novel that charts the brutal and tragic progress of an obsessive homosexual passion. 1 The novel, though, is not necessarily, as Alan Sinfield suggests, nothing more than the celebration of ‘an emerging

in Queering the Gothic
Dafydd W. Jones

arrangement between Lausanne and London – ‘I don’t think that, in marrying my father, she felt any love for him; her choice was dictated solely by the question of money’17 – and it was in London, on 6 July 1885, that a first child was born to the Lloyds, named Otho St Clair Lloyd, elder sibling to the future Arthur Cravan. One month before Otho’s birth, his cousin Cyril was born on 5 June 1885, also in London, a first son from the marriage of Constance Mary Lloyd and Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde. The latter, yes, Oscar Wilde, was occasionally acquainted with Otho

in The fictions of Arthur Cravan
Daniel Orrells

critique and suspicion of the useful and the industrial.7 Inspired by the fatalist and romantic idea that nothing will last forever, decadent artists sought to capture something fleeting, making their passions seem unbridled. The culture of collecting at the fin de siècle summed up the decadent style, with fictional collectors such as Joris Karl Huysmans’ Des Esseintes and Oscar Wilde’s Dorian Gray looking for new impressions and experiences in contravention of conventional tastes and values. Decadence blurred the boundaries between good and bad taste, the beautiful and

in Richard Marsh, popular fiction and literary culture, 1890–1915
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Catherine Maxwell and Stefano Evangelista

When, in 1895, various writers were asked who should be the next Poet Laureate after Tennyson, Oscar Wilde’s reply was emphatic: ‘Mr Swinburne is already the Poet Laureate of England. The fact that his appointment to this high commission has not been degraded by official confirmation renders his position all the more unassailable. He whom all poets love is the Laureate

in Algernon Charles Swinburne
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Tanya Cheadle

bourgeoisie, however. While the borderlines of class were threatened by the violent clashes of Bloody Sunday in November 1887 and the subsequent strikes by match girls and dockers, the borderlines of sexuality and gender were rendered equally vulnerable by the twin perils of the masculine New Woman and effeminate decadent man. The novelist George Gissing, frustrated by what he called the ‘crass imbecility of the typical woman’, predicted an impending era of ‘sexual anarchy’, while in Punch, a day into Oscar Wilde’s first criminal trial, an ‘Angry Old Buffer’ blustered over

in Sexual progressives
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Brian Mcfarlane

Sarris, The American Cinema: Directors and Directions ig2g-ic)68 (New York, E. P. Dutton & Co), 1968. 2 Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, Act Two. 3 Steve Neale, Genre (London, BFI Publishing), 1980; Thomas Schatz, Hollywood Genres (New York), 1981

in Lance Comfort