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On mediated unity and overarching legal-political form
Darrow Schecter

, and the movement of refugees across the world. That means breaking with the conservatism inherent in plan-​versus-​market and nationalisation-​versus-​ privatisation approaches to the economy. But it also means re-​examining, in more general terms, the premises that continue to inform prevailing notions of democratic statehood and citizenship, starting with the central theme of this chapter. The term mediated unity expresses the idea that, if there was no way to bridge the political distance between citizens and the state through intermediary instances of public and

in Critical theory and sociological theory
Abstract only
A plea for politics at the European level
Peter J. Verovšek

of justice … [that] make it compatible with a more just social democratic model of society.’ 33 In addition to its anti-trust cases against Google, another example of this is the development and passage into law of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which seeks to give individuals control over the use of their private online data. Because it applies to any enterprise that deals with subjects located within the EU regardless of citizenship, it has had a profound effect on global data-sharing practices. Despite its successes, the basic problem is that

in Memory and the future of Europe
Thomas Osborne

power predates our modernity. It is, genealogically speaking, a Christian phenomenon. In a well-known pair of lectures, Foucault sketched the ways in which Christianity modified the Hebraic notion of the pastorate and then welded this conception on to the Greek notion of citizenship. 44 The Christian pastorate was a form of knowledge and conduct that mutated into a form of power – our modern ‘political rationality’ of the State – that is both individualising and in a sense totalitarian, a government of all and of each. Its object is at once the life of the

in The structure of modern cultural theory
Mads Qvortrup

right of property is the most sacred of all rights of citizenship, and even more important in some respects than liberty itself because it affects the preservation of life’ [‘le droit de propriété est le plus sacré de tous les droits des citoyens’] (III: 263). Indeed, in Emile he even adopts the same justification of property rights as Locke had developed in his Second Treatise (Locke 1988: 99). Locke had argued that ‘though the earth and all inferior creatures are common to all men, yet he has property in his own person … the labour of his body and the work of his

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Human rights violations by ‘private’ transnational actors
Gunther Teubner

’. 21 On the political strategies of societal constitutionalism see Anderson, ‘Social democracy’, pp. 33 ff.; Hardt and Negri, Multitude , pp. 202 ff.; Davis et al. , ‘Social Rights, Social Citizenship, and Transformative Constitutionalism’. 22 This suggestion is from

in Critical theory and legal autopoiesis
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Democratic state, capitalist society, or dysfunctional differentiation?
Darrow Schecter

territorially based statehood in an increasingly globalised world. This is a world in which knowledge, which cannot be consolidated within national borders, is fundamentally important for both social systems and active citizenship. During the course of the preceding chapters it has been asked whether the existing nation state can continue to steer on so many fronts, and whether the model of ministerial responsibility still offers a framework for flexible and responsive administration. In theoretical terms, it is tempting to see the time from the publication of the Philosophy

in Critical theory and sociological theory
Daniel Weinstock

Jurisdictions ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 2001 ). 20 See W. Kymlicka , Multicultural Citizenship ( Oxford : Oxford University Press , 1995 ). 21 Philip Pettit has made this point in a number of writings, including ‘ The Consequentialist Perspective ’, in M. Baron, P. Pettit and M. Slote, Three Methods on Ethics ( London : Routledge , 1997 ). 22 Susan Okin ’s book Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women? ( Princeton : Princeton University Press , 1999 ) has been an important font for this kind of thinking. 23 On this issue see J

in Toleration, power and the right to justification
Open Access (free)
The life and times of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Mads Qvortrup

there (Cranston 1991: 5). He sang the praises of the rural life, but did not settle in Geneva. The city of Geneva reinstated his citizenship in 1755 – after the publication of his Discourse on Inequality (which contained a preface which praised the city). Rousseau, however, did not seem anxious to practice what he what he had preached in his Discourse. Further, he later noted that he was upset that the city of his birth had admitted Voltaire to live in Geneva. ‘I knew’, wrote Rousseau, ‘that this man would cause a revolution that I should find again in my own country

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Eurosclerosis (1959– 84) and the second phase of integration (1985– 2003)
Peter J. Verovšek

emerge in the Treaty of Maastricht (1992). Officially known as the Treaty on European Union, this agreement paved the way for the expansion of the CM and granted the nationals of the member-states European citizenship. As citizens of the newly created European Union (previously Community), individuals from the member-states were allowed to work anywhere in Europe and were granted voting rights in that country’s local as well European parliamentary elections. Nicolas Jabko points out that ‘it was obvious at the time of the Maastricht treaty that the idea of European

in Memory and the future of Europe
The Eurozone crisis, Brexit, and possible disintegration
Peter J. Verovšek

van den Burg quoted in van Middelaar, The Passage to Europe , 265; C. Lapavitsas et al. , Crisis in the Eurozone ( London : Verso , 2012 ), 90 –91 . 55 In A. Burr Overstreet , ‘ The Nature and Prospects of European Institutions: A Report on the Second Carnegie Endowment Conference on International Organization ,’ Journal of Common Market Studies , 3 : 2 ( 1964 ), 131 –132 . 56 R. Bellamy and A. Warleigh , ‘ From an Ethics of Integration to an Ethics of Participation: Citizenship and the Future of the European Union ,’ Millennium , 27

in Memory and the future of Europe