Imperio Argentina and Penélope Cruz as Nazi Germany’s exotic Other

. The role of Goebbels is played for laughs, but his presence harks back to the persistent rumour of Hitler’s affair with Argentina as well as the real Goebbels’ own desire for the Spanish star. Both films offer Argentina/Macarena as a form of Spanish exotica for the upper echelons of Nazi Germany, symbolised by Goebbels, with Argentina/Macarena inspiring a desire for the exotic Other that relates to the original Carmen story

in Screening songs in Hispanic and Lusophone cinema
Gothic aesthetics and feminine identification in the filmic adaptations of Clive Barker

representation of pleasure and pain. This is primarily because Barker's vision offers a complex interplay of aesthetics and modes of emotional affect, and more importantly for the female horror film audience, his sensibility invites a strong sense of identification and desire around the concept of highly ambiguous and desirable figures of monstrosity. Barker's work (in both film and

in Clive Barker
British and German war memorials after 1918

v 14 v Mixing memory and desire: British and German war memorials after 1918 Adrian Barlow The Armistice, bringing the fighting of the First World War to an end, allowed barely a pause before the next phase began: that of memorialising the events and the victims of the past four years. To memorialise is, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, ‘to preserve the memory of; to be or supply a memorial of; to commemorate’. Memorialising is a way of giving significance to memory. It can be understood as the deliberate act of determining why someone or something

in The silent morning
Abstract only
Marie Helena Loughlin

maintaining friendships: ‘Love is the life of friendship, letters are / The life of love’ and ‘Speech is the index, Letters ideas are / Of the informing soul’ ( J. Howell, ‘To the Reader’, Epistolae Ho-Elianae (1645),15; Henderson 331–3). Not only do familiar letters reveal the inner mind of the writer, they often imply an intimacy and a capacity for conveying desire, which perhaps increase in intensity of expression precisely because they are predicated on the absence of the beloved. In the words of John Donne’s famous verse epistle ‘To Sir Henry Wotton’: ‘Sir, more than

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Marie Helena Loughlin

. – And you’re a bold face. – Eh ye little dear toad! Come, buss [i.e., kiss]! – Then they’d hug, and 116 Loughlin, Same-sex desire in early modern England.indd 116 18/12/2013 15:25:06 The New ‘Homosexual’ Subculture play, and toy, and go out by couples into another room on the same floor, to be married, as they called it. (qtd in Norton, Mother 55) Trial transcripts and published polemics describing and condemning the new ‘homosexual’ subculture have, however, proved highly controversial sources, particularly when they have been used to date the shift from

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Abstract only
Marie Helena Loughlin

–14). Of the following presentations of tribadism in Africa and the East, Africanus’s is unsurprisingly the most measured. In a telling rejection of superstition, Africanus asserts that tribadic relationships do not spring from demonic possession, as he asserts is the popular conception in Africa and the Middle East, but are instead part of a ‘confidence’ subculture, where women desiring other women manipulate husbands into colluding in their own cuckoldry. By presenting Islamic culture as condemning tribadism, Africanus suggests the moral and ethical equivalency between

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Marie Helena Loughlin

as sodomy, was in a different category of sin from forbidden heterosexual acts (Borris, Same-Sex 28). In his discussion of Romans 1.24–31, Calvin calls sodomy the ‘overthrowing of the whole order of nature’. In contrast, forbidden heterosexual acts within and outside of marriage were (according 1 Along with murder, oppression of the poor, and the defrauding of the labourer. 27 Loughlin, Same-sex desire in early modern England.indd 27 18/12/2013 15:25:00 Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England to Thomas Aquinas, at least) less serious: they were violations

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Marie Helena Loughlin

ch a pt e r 7 The Classical Tradition in Translation The Classical Tradition in Translation Introduction The humanist recovery of Latin and Greek texts revealed to early modern readers the homoerotic relationships of celebrated Greek and Roman men, such as Plato, Socrates, Alcibiades, Alexander the Great, and Virgil. Moreover, classical texts often presented such relationships positively or at least neutrally. Plutarch’s influential biographies of famous Greeks and Romans, for example, comment censoriously only on men whose homoerotic desires and acts were part

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735
Marie Helena Loughlin

treatment of offenders. Between 1470 and 1516, the London Church courts prosecuted only one sodomy case; the accused’s ‘non-appearance’ before the court resulted in his excommunication, but not apparently in corporal punishment or heavy fines (Crompton, Homosexuality 362). The late Middle Age’s revival of Roman law coupled with Scripture’s emphasis on homoerotic acts and desires as inherently sinful gradually transformed these acts – in particular anal intercourse between men (sodomy) – from sins (governed by ecclesiastical law through the Church courts and the sacrament

in Same-Sex Desire in Early Modern England, 1550–1735

Part III Labyrinths of desire 18 Clive Barker, ‘Saint Sinner’, 1993.

in Clive Barker