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Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

Intervention in Egypt contrasted dramatically with recent campaigns in Africa and Afghanistan. It involved the largest expeditionary force despatched by Britain since the Crimean War and achieved a decisive outcome in less than two months, that is, from the passing of a vote of credit by the House of Commons for an expeditionary force (27 July 1882) to the crushing victory at

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
A Session at the 2019 Modern Language Association Convention
Robert Jackson, Sharon P. Holland and Shawn Salvant

“Interventions” was the organizing term for the presentations of three Baldwin scholars at the Modern Language Association Convention in Chicago in January of 2019. Baldwin’s travels and activities in spaces not traditionally associated with him, including the U.S. South and West, represent interventions of a quite literal type, while his aesthetic and critical encounters with these and other cultures, including twenty-first-century contexts of racial, and racist, affect—as in the case of Raoul Peck’s 2016 film I Am Not Your Negro—provide opportunities to reconsider his work as it contributes to new thinking about race, space, property, citizenship, and aesthetics.

James Baldwin Review
Abstract only
Gabriele Griffin and Doris Leibetseder

embodied selves, is created through regulations and norms that encourage or require individuals to seek or provide bodily interventions of different kinds, in particular in relation to intimacy and intimate labour, such as in the making of families and kin, in various forms of care work and in the making of identities. In thinking through the ways in which embodied selves are precarized in intimate labour we draw on the work of Michel Foucault, Roberto Esposito, Nikolas Rose, Judith Butler and a number of other theoreticians who have explored the relation between body

in Bodily interventions and intimate labour
Abstract only
Gabriele Griffin and Doris Leibetseder

In this volume we have considered how bodily interventions, and their seeking and their doing through intimate labour, produce bioprecarity. Using a range of very different examples we argue that to understand bioprecarity as we develop it in this volume means thinking through the ways in which the body, life, the production, maintenance and application of categories and intimate labour are entangled. This entanglement creates a complex biosociality (Mohr, 2018 ) far beyond those immediately involved. One reason for this entanglement relates to the threat to

in Bodily interventions and intimate labour
Gabriele Griffin

labour by Guy Standing ( 2011 ). The chapter develops these three concepts in the context of bodily interventions prompted by opportunities for bodily labour, meaning labour on and with the body, in order to investigate bioprecarity , a form of vulnerability that is associated with providing and seeking intimate bodily labour, not least in cross-cultural contexts. While separating out intimate labour, bios and precarity for analytical purposes, we recognize and argue that they are deeply imbricated. Bioprecarity conjoins the notion of bios as derived from Michel

in Bodily interventions and intimate labour
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

NATO’s employment of military power against the government of Slobodan Milosevic over Kosovo has been among the most controversial aspects of the Alliance’s involvement in South East Europe since the end of the Cold War. The air operations between March and June 1999 have been variously described as war, ‘humanitarian war’, ‘virtual war’, intervention and ‘humanitarian intervention’ by the conflict

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Georg Elwert

12 Intervention in markets of violence Georg Elwert Introduction    backbone of a state, the monopoly of violence. The society loses its cohesion. Behind smokescreens of ethnic, political, religious or other ideological goals appears a new – mainly economic – reference for social action: acquisition based upon violence. Markets of violence are highly profitable social systems, which can remain stable over several decades. The dominant actors in this system, the warlords, combine violent appropriation with peaceful exchange. Markets of violence

in Potentials of disorder
T. M. Devine

15 THE INTERVENTION OF THE STATE I The great drama of the clearances had been played out between the landowners and the people with occasional interventions from external forces of law and order. With the passage of the Crofters’ Act in 1886, however, social and economic conditions and relations in the western Highlands and islands could never be the same again. The state had become a major factor in influencing the future development of the region both through statute law, which established in 1886 new controls on the relationship between landlord and tenant

in Clanship to crofters’ war
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

On intervention Among the handful of humanitarian interventions of the nineteenth century the intervention in Cuba is the most controversial, in view of the US reluctance to leave Cuba and the huge advantages it accrued, including the acquisition of even the faraway Philippines. Any discussion of the US stance on intervention before 1914 has to take into consideration the Monroe Doctrine of 1823. 1 The Doctrine contained three principles: (1

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)
A bird’s eye view of intervention with emphasis on Britain, 1875–78
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

On intervention The great power involvement triggered by the Bulgarian atrocities was part of a wider international reaction to uprisings in the Balkans known as the Great Eastern Crisis of 1875–78, which was to change the map of the Balkans. Events began with the Serbs of Herzegovina (July 1875), followed a little later by Bosnia, the Bulgarians (April–May 1876) and the war of the autonomous principalities of Serbia and Montenegro

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century