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of artists such as Dylan and the Beatles appears far more substantial than one thought. For, not only did they benefit from the idea that it is possible to use one’s art to help manifest the sacred in the profane, but they also took that idea further than had been possible for the people who influenced them. While I have said from the outset that musicology is not our concern, it has to be acknowledged that the power of popular song to make the spiritual dimension of existence seem immediate, and to make complex religious philosophies accessible, gives songwriters

in Beat sound, Beat vision
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Reading sacred space in late medieval England

maintained, what is sacrilege, how should we read the painted church? Michel Foucault described the Middle Ages as a space of ‘emplacement’, foregrounding the ‘hierarchic ensemble of places’ such as sacred and profane, celestial and terrestrial.6 In The Production of Space, Henri Lefebvre argued that the Middle Ages is ‘inhabited, haunted by the church’ and he asks ‘what would remain of the Church if there were no churches?’7 This is precisely the question that arises in Middle English debates on the material church in the light of Lollard concerns. How important was the

in The church as sacred space in Middle English literature and culture

space consists of an ‘intersection of mobile elements’ that are ‘actuated by the ensemble of movements deployed within it’.25 He proposes, with reference to the walker in the city, that the action of moving through a space creates its meaning. The procession in the consecration ceremony draws attention to the building as the centre of sacred space and begins the work of differentiating between sacred and profane space. The physical movement of the body marks out the space as sacred. The ceremony not only consecrates the material church, however, it also consecrates

in The church as sacred space in Middle English literature and culture
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saying that one should treat ‘real life’ with ‘religious reverence’. Put in more abstract, academic terms, we might say that its purpose is to reveal the ‘sacred’ in the ‘profane’. Here we should pause to clarify those last two terms. The first is not a problem: it is synonymous with ‘holy’: to have a sense of the sacred is to have a sense of ‘religious reverence’. The second term needs slightly more explanation, particularly as these days it is used interchangeably with ‘obscene’. Going further into its etymology, however, we discover that it derives from the Latin

in Beat sound, Beat vision
Open Access (free)

creationism I usually avoided those issues. One reason why I originally enjoyed my work on societal and cultural issues in nanotechnology was because I thought there were no issues of origins and ontology in this area. There is no religious denomination that I know of that argues that atoms and molecules are unreal. But in 2007 Jamie Wetmore at Arizona State University showed me that there were indeed some issues of religious reactions to nanotechnology, and that they are important. I have circled back to questions of the sacred and the profane in science and technology

in Science and the politics of openness
The case of Pier Paolo Pasolini

. 11 Accatone performs contamination: the film commingles the profane with the sacred, social abjection with the saintly. At the centre of the film is a fight in the slums of Rome. The frame of the profane fight scene draws upon sacred allusions: long shots accompanied by Bach’s religious music from the St. Matthew Passion. The voices of Bach’s music sing of eternal peace whereas the reality of the

in Incest in contemporary literature

the same building, and also an image, or rather a counterfeit of one. And although this building – which we treat with contempt and condemn, and, as much as it pertains to us, we consider and also proclaim profane and condemned, having been built not for the devotion of faith but from the quest of greed, as the profits of the exploits clearly proclaim – is

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
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close of the high middle-ages, however, these elements remained apart from ‘profane domains of life and experience’ (Habermas, 1997a : 214). The Reformation would change this. Weber examined the process of ethical rationalisation it set in motion. The religious asceticism that flowered in medieval monastic orders had to penetrate all extrareligious departments of life , so that profane actions were also subjected to the maxims of the ethic of conviction (which was at first anchored in religion). Weber

in Habermas and European integration
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middle-ages, however, these elements remained apart from ‘profane domains of life and experience’ (Habermas, 1997a: 214). The Reformation would change this. Weber examined the process of ethical rationalisation it set in motion. The religious asceticism that flowered in medieval monastic orders had to penetrate all extrareligious departments of life, so that profane actions were also subjected to the maxims of the ethic of conviction (which was at first anchored in religion). Weber locates this process in the emergence of the Protestant ethic of the calling. By

in Habermas and European Integration (second edition)
From Gary Snyder to Nick Drake

context is Morrison’s absorption in shamanism. This seems to have begun in his childhood, when he believed himself to have been possessed by the spirit of a dead American Indian whose body the Morrison family saw by the roadside shortly after he had been killed in a motor accident.21 The shamanic desire to pass over from profane time and space into sacred time and space is stated most dramatically in the key line from an early song: ‘Break on through to the other side.’22 Shamanism is implicit, though, in the whole endeavour of the Doors, for whom a rock concert was a

in Beat sound, Beat vision