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John H. Arnold and Peter Biller

The 1270s inquisition manual translated in this part provides an ideal version of the inquisitorial actions. A fundamental concern with the records has long been the truth or otherwise of what the deponents confessed when interrogated by inquisitors. Suspicion about inquisition records has its own history, especially in southern France. There is an abundance of modern scholarship on inquisition records. John H. Arnold has analysed the different voices of the records, the balance between inquisitorial categorisation and the excess of detail generated within each deposition.

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300
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Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535

creation of new monastic orders between 1200 and 1540. After the ferment of the eleventh and twelfth centuries when the Cistercian and Carthusian monks and the Augustinian, Premonstratensian and Gilbertine canons were all founded, the establishment of new orders stalled. The thirteenth century saw the appearance of the friars, a new form of religious life based on preaching and charity, supported by

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535

recruits to the religious life should be honourable and genuine rather than numerous. And would that it had been provided by law that no one under the age of thirty should put his head into that kind of noose, before he has learnt to know himself and has discovered the force of true religion! In any case those who take the Pharisees as the model in their business, and course over

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535

dine at the residence of the referendary, Dado, whom he knew to lead a religious life. 19 The incident takes place about the year 636, when King Dagobert I (623–38) was at the height of his power. Yet here Fredegar gives us this curious report of the client king of Brittany, Judicael, who, when he came cowering to Dagobert bearing

in Late Merovingian France
Jews as Europeans in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries

, elsewhere in this series, by Robert Swanson, who writes, when discussing the written sources for English religious life (all Christian, of course) in the late Middle Ages: But some elements are irrecoverable, or very imperfectly recoverable: the emotional responses which were generated by participation in this continuity

in The Jews in western Europe 1400–1600
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‘Rule of St Paul’ which was most commonly adopted. 8 The majority of these hermits retained an officially lay status, but the adoption of the habit may be treated as reflecting a crossing of the border between a secular and regular (= religious) life. For women, the options retained the secularity. Their commitment to a life of chastity, through the taking

in Catholic England

use of more circumstantial evidence to illustrate the importance of the liturgy and some of the ways it was changing in the later middle ages. As the biography of Thomas de la Mare indicates, the liturgy was also an important component in monastic spirituality. This facet of the religious life is not easy to recapture, partly because of the limited and often inaccessible

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535

many of the members of the family were related to each other, the geographical location of their first known landed possessions, and much about their political and religious life in what is now southern Belgium. Compared with the other holy heroes whose vitae are discussed in this volume, Geretrud is presented to us, politically at least, as a sainte fainéante . She was

in Late Merovingian France
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preaching and preaching aids The decades either side of the year 1200 saw a remarkable re-orientation in the religious life of western Europe, characterised in large part by a new and urgent interest in the spiritual life and moral welfare of the laity. From the thirteenth century onwards this led to a remarkable explosion in popular preaching, which is associated mainly with the orders of friars. For while

in Friars’ Tales
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. By 1200 towns in most of Europe were larger and more numerous than they had been. Many shrank in size, at least temporarily, in the plague-ridden years after 1350, but they had by then acquired a collective significance which they would never lose, as centres not only of commercial activity but of government, justice and administration, education, culture and, not least, religious life. In a still

in Saints and cities in medieval Italy