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his blasphemous Treize Idylles diaboliques , a pre-conversion work which depicts Christ and Mary in a conspiracy against God the Father. 32 While writings like Retté’s appear to the reader sensational or lurid, they are part of a tradition reacting against equally lurid freethinking literature which took special pains to deny the supernatural character of the incarnation and any supernatural devotions that went with it. 33 Perhaps the most important portrayal of the incarnation in French Catholic literature is found in Péguy’s Le Mystère

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914

, Barry finds proof of the theory that Freemasonic influence had been the decisive factor contributing to secularising reforms in France. 46 Barry’s pamphlet is only one example of the anti-Freemasonic literature of the time. Earlier in 1885, a year after Leo XIII’s encyclical on Freemasonry and its advocacy of a purely naturalistic philosophy, George F. Dillon had published his own study of Freemasonry called The War of Antichrist with the Church and Christian Civilisation . To the objection that English Freemasonry was much less anticlerical

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914

vain for a miracle to cure her invalidity, and obtains it only later in the novel through the miraculous waters of Lourdes. 9 Positivism and materialistic philosophy naturally declared all such phenomena to be explicable by physical causes; Madame Rouvère’s doctor, for example, says he would view such a cure as proof not of God’s power but of the disorder of the universe, while his colleague claims he has seen fakirs do the same thing. 10 In Baumann’s novel and in other French Catholic literature, however, the miracles associated with Lourdes signified not merely a

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914

the initial decisions. I relied on the EISF (European Interagency Security Forum) network to set up the crisis-management trainings for all the heads of mission. We held several crisis-management trainings in the Sahel, Turkey, Thailand and Kenya. Most MdM heads of mission completed the training between 2013 and 2015. Task Four: Simplifying the Security Tools The EISF network and the humanitarian security literature it curates also helped guide my

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local

building upon existing literature on humanitarian campaigns and critiques of neoliberal approaches to refugee situations. With regards to the latter, it is important to start by acknowledging that humanitarian agencies around the world are facing cumulative funding reductions and a concomitant drive to diversify their donors. Simultaneously, donors and agencies alike are promoting greater degrees of ‘localisation’ – supporting the roles played by regional, national and local actors in affected regions – and ‘self-reliance’ amongst refugee

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Identities in flux in French literature, television, and film

Christiane Taubira's spirited invocation of colonial poetry at the French National Assembly in 2013 denounced the French politics of assimilation in Guyana . It was seen as an attempt to promote respect for difference, defend the equality of gay and heterosexual rights, and give a voice to silent social and cultural minorities. Taubira's unmatched passion for poetry and social justice, applied to the current Political arena, made her an instant star in the media and on the Internet. This book relates to the mimetic and transformative powers of literature and film. It examines literary works and films that help deflate stereotypes regarding France's post-immigration population, promote a new respect for cultural and ethnic minorities. The writers and filmmakers examined in the book have found new ways to conceptualize the French heritage of immigration from North Africa and to portray the current state of multiculturalism in France. The book opens with Steve Puig's helpful recapitulation of the development of beur, banlieue, and urban literatures, closely related and partly overlapping taxonomies describing the cultural production of second-generation, postcolonial immigrants to France. Discussing the works of three writers, the book discusses the birth of a new Maghrebi-French women's literature. Next comes an examination of how the fictional portrayal of women in Guene's novels differs from the representation of female characters in traditional beur literature. The book also explores the development of Abdellatif Kechiche's cinema, Djaidani's film and fiction, French perception of Maghrebi-French youth, postmemorial immigration, fiction, and postmemory and identity in harki.

Cavanaugh’s essay on societal secularisation provides us with a useful paradigm from which to begin analysing anti-secular alternatives. 1 Exploring this paradigm in all its theological resonances is unnecessary. The political and socio-economic dynamics which it outlines correlate with, and in other ways challenge, French and English Catholic writings about societal organisation. On the political level, Cavanaugh argues that ‘Eucharistic counter-politics’ have the capacity to undermine the secular State in two

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
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Intertextuality in the fiction and criticism

This is a study on the literary relation between Beckett and Dante. It is a reading of Samuel Beckett and Dante's works and a critical engagement with contemporary theories of intertextuality. The book gives a reading of Beckett's work, detecting previously unknown quotations, allusions to, and parodies of Dante in Beckett's fiction and criticism. It is aimed at the scholarly communities interested in literatures in English, literary and critical theory, comparative literature and theory, French literature and theory and Italian studies.

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A spirited exchange 1760-1960
Editor: Avril Horner

The essays in this book demonstrate the importance of translation and European writing in the development of the Gothic novel. Cross-cultural exchanges occurred with the translation of novels by English writers into French. The book first situates works by British writers and American writers within a European context and legacy. Next, it offers readings of less-known works by Gothic authors. The book introduces the reader to a range of neglected, albeit influential, European Gothic texts which originated in Russian, Spanish, French and German. It argues that the level of ideological manipulation, which occurred as texts were translated, mistranslated, appropriated, misappropriated, altered and adapted from one language to another, was so considerable and so systematic that generic mutations were occasioned. The book suggests that Matthew Lewis's The Monk offers a few models of femininity, all deriving from and intended to disrupt, previous literary representations. It focuses on the automatic and the systematic in Charles Maturin's work in relation to Denis Diderot's contemporary philosophical conceptualizations of consciousness and identity. Gothic treacheries are dealt with through Samuel Coleridge's analysis of misappropriation of Friedrich Schiller's Die Rauber. The book also discusses the representations of ritual violence, as sanctioned by the Catholic Church, in English and Spanish pictorial and literary texts between 1796 and 1834. It talks about the Arabesque narrative technique of embedding tales within tales to create a maze in which even the storyteller becomes lost, reflecting the Eastern notion that the created is more important than the creator.

New configurations of Frenchness in contemporary urban fiction

the process through which immigrants are being assimilated into French culture. In the 1980s, the concept of beur1 culture emerged to express the feeling of belonging to two cultures: one that originated in the Maghreb (Algeria, Morocco, or Tunisia) and a French one, which has been increasingly challenged by the arrival of new immigrants from former French colonies. In the 1990s, beur literature as well as the word beur itself started to become obsolete, as this new generation felt more and more assimilated or “integrated” into French society. In 2007, a collective

in Reimagining North African Immigration