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Abstract only
Sandra Buchanan

Policy context In a policy context, neither the Irish nor UK governments possess conflict transformation policies relating to the conflict on their doorstep; their strategies in this regard have been firmly placed within the (international) development cooperation arena. 54 In doing so a serious contradiction emerges: on the one hand, they obviously see a need for laying out

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Sandra Buchanan

the Irish or British contexts, the lack of a live peacebuilding policy from the British government has been highlighted by Smith. In discussing the peacebuilding practice of Germany, the Netherlands, Norway and the UK, he found that all countries ‘lack single official statements of their approach to peacebuilding – having, rather, a plethora of statements about aspects of their policy

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development
Racialisation of countering violent extremism programming in the US
Priya Dixit

this, however, government policies on extremism in the US remain focused mainly (and, often, only) on jihadist extremism and ignore the rising violence from right-wing extremists. 2 This chapter addresses this gap with regard to violent extremism in the US, wherein right-wing violent extremists are often ignored in government policies and programmes on preventing and countering extremism in general. It argues that this erasure of right-wing extremism, both violent and non-violent, from discussions and policies regarding extremism in the US creates a context wherein

in Encountering extremism
Mark Webber

There is an opinion within the EU, to use the words of one-time German Chancellor Gerhard Schröder, that ‘the strategic and security policy argument is decisive’. 53 Yet Germany, as well as other member states such as the UK supportive of Turkish accession, have rejected any assumption that security considerations should usurp the Copenhagen criteria. 54 What Dietrich Jung has referred

in Inclusion, exclusion and the governance of European Security
Mark Webber

member states – with the main line of division being between the UK, Spain and Italy on the one hand, and France, Germany and Belgium on the other. The same has also been true post-2004. The accession states have brought to the EU sometimes distinct foreign policy preoccupations. They share a generally Atlanticist orientation and have been concerned more ‘with territorial defence and regional

in Inclusion, exclusion and the governance of European Security
Imogen Richards

as wholly neoliberal. The extent of their capitalist financial practices is, rather, interpreted as noteworthy given its apparent contradiction with their propaganda, and its impact on the underlying economic structures that contribute to the perpetuation of both neoliberalism and the phenomenon of neo-jihadism. In line with Peck’s (2010) explanation of neoliberal political economy, AQ and IS’s financial practices are here interpreted as a series of ‘layers’, where policies and programmes adopted by the organisations build upon pre-existing political

in Neoliberalism and neo-jihadism
Imogen Richards

). Under monetarist economic policy management during these years, the UK saw interest rates rise to 17 per cent, while the US witnessed a decrease in tax rates to 20 per cent, from 78 per cent, for the country’s wealthiest citizens ( Reitan 2003 , 29; Dorian 2010 , 166). Although the tactics and diplomacy of the administrations differed in several respects, both operated according to a belief that rapid fiscal growth would trickle down from major industries and benefit their respective countries. Both administrations also committed to neoliberal programmes under the

in Neoliberalism and neo-jihadism
Managing the great power relations trilemma
Graeme P. Herd

J. Diehl, ‘US Model – light footprint doctrine: Foreign policy red flags’, Washington Post (12 November 2012), p. A19; H. LaFranchi, ‘Commando raids: Africa’s “arc of instability” reorienting US terror map’, Christian Science Monitor (7 October 2013); J. Stavridis, ‘Spectre of religious war looms over Arab world’, Sunday

in Violence and the state
Opportunities for a security dialogue
Dmitry Polikanov

Yukos case. Hence, the parties reached a certain impasse in their relations and had to consider the advisability of adapting their strategies to a new reality. Along with intra-EU problems, such as the complicated process of post-enlargement adaptation, the situation is further aggravated by the ambiguity of Russia’s foreign policy during Vladimir Putin’s second term. The praised predictability of

in The security dimensions of EU enlargement
A framework of inclusion and exclusion
Mark Webber

the Cold War and more so after it, occurs in such a way that the interests of a nation state (France, Germany, the UK etc.) are ‘redefined by an inclusion of “Europe”’. ‘[T]he overall foreign policy line’, he continues, ‘must be explainable as to where this leaves “us”: what kind of future for “France”/“Germany” […] in what kind of Europe’. 52 For Michael Williams, identity

in Inclusion, exclusion and the governance of European Security