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, a black man native to the island of Antigua, who migrated to Canada in 1975, played cricket when he arrived. For him, this was an expression of his race and masculinity, a source of friendship, fitness and, ultimately, bodily disrepair. Many Caribbean men’s stories about their migration experiences, settling in Toronto’s urban and suburban neighbourhoods, finding jobs, returning home for visits and

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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(Women’s Association), December 4th, 1914’. Grand Orange Lodge of Ireland, Minute Book, GLOL, Women’s Association. 13 For the conservatism of gender ideologies in the north of Ireland, see Jane McGaughey’s study of Ulster masculinities, Ulster’s Men: Protestant Unionist Masculinities and Militarization in the North of Ireland, 1912–1923 (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2012). For a later period in Northern Ireland, see also S. Brady, ‘Why examine men, masculinities and religion in Northern Ireland?’, in L. Delap and S. Morgan (eds), Men

in Women and the Orange Order

have a benevolent dictator it still wouldn’t be valued, what is valued is the sense of collegiality…[to] create a common vision, common purpose … around ­collegiality … creating a community around it without creating division’ (Jane Morrisson). There were references to the importance of ‘good consensus building skills’ (Professor Marie Walsh). Manager-­academics and other professional managers were equally likely to refer to such collegial characteristics. In effect then these respondents were endorsing a particular construct of masculinity, one that was gentler than

in Management and gender in higher education
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Universities in a changing society

success (Mannion, 2011; Sealy and Singh, 2010). Of course gender diversity does not always guarantee the existence of diversity of thought. However, it is symbolically important in challenging the equation between masculinity and authority and in affirming women’s existential value (Therborn, 2005). In summary, this book is concerned with higher education and with the elite and the gendered world of senior management. The university as an institution Universities are one of the most enduring institutions historically and cross-­ nationally dating back to the late

in Management and gender in higher education
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their bleeding shins, foreheads, elbows and the resulting scars to attest to how serious and passionate they once were – and in some cases, still are – about the game. The dangerous situations they put themselves in, especially in the 1970s as ferocious fast bowling became a marker of Windies pride, also attest to their bravery, a marker of Afro-Caribbean masculinity. Roland, a 51-year-old black Guyanese

in Sport in the Black Atlantic

vindicated by abundant examples of academics who explicitly side with the fans that they are closest to or who, by their own admission, even use academic writings to further a cause they are defending as supporters.45 Furthermore, King argues that the end of the terraces, i.e. the transformation of English football stadia into all-seaters, fundamentally altered the composition of the crowd. It is now more affluent, feminine (or familial) and ethnically diverse.46 Others have argued that masculinity is still dominant in English stadia. It has only been renegotiated (notably

in Foreign players and football supporters

Read, 2009: 119). They maintained their position through exclusionary and demarcatory strategies (Witz, 1992) in gendered power structures, including universities. Technical expertise has been seen as the basis for such professionals’ legitimate authority; the interests of clients being protected by controlling and credentializing access to such expertise (Friedson, 2001). Stereotypical images of a professional fit with constructs of masculinity. Thus to be a professional is ‘to do’ gender: to comply with often implicit norms surrounding masculinity (Bolton and

in Management and gender in higher education
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State-supported agency

pullover with yellow crowns, the colours of the Swedish flag and the symbol of the Swedish realm. The message was two-fold. Caring fatherhood was both masculine and patriotically Swedish (Bergman and Hobson, 2002:107). According to Klinth it was a government promotion of proactive fatherhood through an appeal to Swedish working-class masculinity: It was probably not a coincidence that an almost hyper-masculine figure like a muscular weight lifter was picked to personify the new father. The message was clear: if a man takes paternity leave, he is no less of a man. (2008

in Between two worlds of father politics

individuals hell-bent on individual survival, and Levi was by no means alone in pointing to the experience of the camps as one of overwhelming shame (Levi 2013: 72–93). However, his account is typical in not recognising that part of the shame, at least, resulted from the emasculation, the undermining of men’s masculinity; and it is typical in not mentioning women at all, although Levi does refer with some disgust to women German and Polish workers in another of his accounts, If This is a Man, while at the same time discussing the shame of looking bedraggled and smelling

in Bauman and contemporary sociology

), although that is exactly where one pole of his ambivalent response to the debates about postmodernity was pointing. Blackshaw’s study (2003) of working-class masculinity, in Leeds, Bauman’s home city, while reliant on Bauman’s theorisation of modernity/ postmodernity and solid modernity/liquid modernity, shows how the lessons of the poststructuralist turn in anthropology can be deployed in ethnographic research in sociology. Paradoxically, one of the reasons for Bauman’s lack of interest in and engagement with these new developments in the social sciences, philosophy of

in Bauman and contemporary sociology