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Mark Robson

, on speech and writing, on the voice and the gaze. In particular, these questions have a special pertinence in the context of recent calls for an attention to sense, and to the senses, and the proposal that such attention might best come through a phenomenological approach. For it seems clear that phenomenology quickly embeds itself within a visuality that supplants and supplements orality. In other words, the eye and the ear change places, but without ever being able to eliminate the residue of the one in the other, like a foreign body, continuing to work like the

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Hegel

The beginning of aesthetic theory and the end of art

Andrew Bowie

individuality. In the view which argues for the limits of the reflection model it is precisely the ontological gap between myself and the other inherent in the fact of immediate self-consciousness which gives rise to the need for new forms of articulation and expression. While these forms are intersubjectively constituted – Beethoven uses many of the musical conventions of his time – they can yet be employed in unique, individual ways. Let us see, then, how Hegel arrives at his position. The Phenomenology of Spirit (PG) (1807) is an account of the stages of this process of

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Chris Abel

and theory. It then moves to a more detailed look at the writings of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Michael Polanyi1 on the body as the nucleus or fulcrum of human experience. Though neither author wrote directly about architecture or urban form, their work has significant implications for understanding the way people relate to their environment.2 Of the two, Merleau-Ponty is the better-known author and a philosopher in the same school of thought as Martin Heidegger, both of whom in turn acknowledge Edmund Husserl3 as the intellectual father of phenomenology. Together

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Chris Abel

chapter follows the new thinking and discoveries of leading researchers in the field, some of whom have been motivated by the belief that a full understanding of the self and consciousness will come about only from a broadening of the cognitive and neurosciences to encompass the phenomenology of human experience. From an exploration of current concepts of the self and embodied minds, the discussion then moves on to some of the more specific and important discoveries in the latter field, many of which lend empirical support to Merleau-Ponty and Polanyi’s speculations

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Was Schutz a positivist? Was he even a sociologist?

Comparing the reception and inception of his work

Martyn Hammersley

obscured. Schutz wrote the only book he published in his lifetime, translated as The Phenomenology of the Social World, in Vienna, around the time when Schlick, Carnap, and others were developing and publishing their ideas. Schutz did not belong to what we now refer to as the Vienna Circle, but he did participate in two other intellectual circles in that city: that around the economist Ludwig von Mises, and also the Geist Kreis, a seminar on science and philosophy founded by Friedrich von Hayek.5 Moreover, Schutz’s close friend Felix Kaufmann was a participant not only

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‘The needle may convert more than the pen’

Women and the work of conversion in early modern England

Claire Canavan and Helen Smith

similarly capacious, embracing a ‘turning in position, direction, destination’. 6 Gunter’s ‘staggering’, then, can be read as the necessary stumbling that allows for a change of direction; in the terms of the queer phenomenology proposed by Sara Ahmed, ‘in order to become orientated . . . we must first experience disorientation’. 7 Gunter’s conversion or

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Cinema, democracy and perfectionism

Joshua Foa Dienstag in dialogue

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Edited by: Joshua Foa Dienstag

This book engages in a critical encounter with the work of Stanley Cavell on cinema, focusing skeptical attention on the claims made for the contribution of cinema to the ethical character of democratic life. In much of Cavell's writing on film he seeks to show us that the protagonists of the films he terms "remarriage comedies" live a form of perfectionism that he upholds as desirable for contemporary democratic society: moral perfectionism. Films are often viewed on television, and television shows can have "filmlike" qualities. The book addresses the nature of viewing cinematic film as a mode of experience, arguing against Cavell that it is akin to dreaming rather than lived consciousness and, crucially, cannot be shared. It mirrors the celebrated dialogue between Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Jean D'Alembert on theatre. The book articulates the implications of philosophical pessimism for addressing contemporary culture in its relationship to political life. It clarifies how The Americans resembles the remarriage films and can illuminate the issues they raise. The tragedy of remarriage, would be a better instructor of a democratic community, if such a community were prepared to listen. The book suggests that dreaming, both with and without films, is not merely a pleasurable distraction but a valuable pastime for democratic citizens. Finally, it concludes with a robust response from Dienstag to his critics.

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Conclusion

Implications for war reporting, journalism studies and political phenomenology

Tim Markham

3681 The Politics of war reporting.qxd:Layout 1 28/9/11 11:14 Page 152 8 Conclusion: implications for war reporting, journalism studies and political phenomenology Introduction This chapter considers the implications of an analytical perspective on journalism which focuses on the politics underlying the lived aspects of journalism that ‘just are’. The approach taken in this book has asked what structures consciousness of the professional world as given, and what structuring effects normalisation of this consciousness might have – and in each case we are

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Christophe Wall-Romana

acquire movement only because of an illusion, hence it is not a true moving flow; and, third, cinema is but a translation of the temporal (actual motion) into the spatial (the film strip), thus bringing back what, for Bergson, is the major error of philosophy, the spatializing of time. We will see later what correctives Epstein brings to this selective understanding of cinema and the phenomenology of filmic perception. Yet for all of Bergson’s technophobia – we can call it that since it is a wilfully partial account – cinema acts nonetheless as the precious litmus test

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Helen Barr

Chapter Seven discusses the composition of the cover image in relation to temporal circularity, mirror images and the phenomenology of left/right apprehension.