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Cinemagoing in the early months of the war
Richard Farmer

in places such as the suburbs of London, for example, these different areas were often contiguous, producing a situation where cinemas on one side of a political boundary – which might run down the middle of a road – were allowed to reopen, and those on the other remained subject to enforced closure. Other districts were composed of both neutral and reception areas: in such instances, it was usually the case that all cinemas were to remain closed, but was this fair?25 Above and beyond all this was concern for the safety of the public. Even in the absence of air

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45
Richard Farmer

Sound, 37:10 (Spring 1941), p. 10. 3 Kinematograph Weekly, 26 October 1944, p. 5. From late 1944, Middlesex County Council amended this regulation: one attendant was required per 250 patrons in newer cinemas, and one for every 200 in older, less fire-resistant venues. 4 Ideal Kinema, 4 December 1941, p. i. 155 156 Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45 5 Jennifer Craik, ‘The cultural politics of the uniform’, Fashion Theory, 7:2 (2003), p. 128. 6 Ideal Kinema, 15 January 1942, p. v. 7 J. H. Hutchison, The Complete Kinemanager (London

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45
Richard Farmer

gently, inventively or humorously – that they needed to remain community-minded smacked of redundancy, for what was a cinema audience if not an instinctive and voluntary community hoping to achieve common goals? The cultural promotion of the communal ideal at the national level arose from a political reality in which individuals were corralled into a well-regulated collective. A web of rules, legislation and obligations created a specific place for, and idea of, the individual within the war effort that provided greatly reduced scope for personal choice. The sense of

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45