The punk and post-punk worlds of Manchester, London, Liverpool and Sheffield, 1975–80

This book argues that punk and post-punk, whatever their respective internal stylistic heterogeneity, enjoyed 'sociological reality' in Samuel Gilmore's and Howard Becker's sense. It elaborates the concept of 'music worlds', contrasting it with alternatives from the sociological literature. In particular it contrasts it with the concepts 'subculture', 'scene' and 'field'. The book then outlines a number of concepts which allow us to explore the localised process in which punk took shape in a sociologically rigorous manner. In particular it discusses the concepts of 'critical mass' and 'social networks'. The book also applies these concepts to the London punk world of 1976. It considers how talk about punk migrated from face-to-face networks to mass media networks and the effects of that shift. Continuing the discussion of punk's diffusion and growth, the book considers how punk worlds took shape in Liverpool, Manchester and Sheffield. In addition, however, the book offers a more technical analysis of the network structures of the post-punk worlds of the three cities. Furthermore, extending this analysis, and combining qualitative and quantitative forms of analysis, the book considers how activities in different local post-punk worlds were themselves linked in a network, constituting a national post-punk world.

The Clash, the dawn of neoliberalism and the political promise of punk
Editor: Colin Coulter

There are few bands that have enjoyed as much adoration or endured as much criticism as The Clash. Emerging originally as a principal voice in the burgeoning mid-1970s London punk scene, The Clash would soon cast off the fetters that restricted many of their peers, their musical tastes becoming ever more eclectic and their political field of vision ever more global. In the process, the band would widen the cultural and political horizons of their audience and would for many come to exemplify the power of popular music to change minds. While The Clash would attract a great deal of critical acclaim, this would always be less than universal. In the eyes of their many detractors, the radical political stance of the band was little more than self-mythologising posture, neatly serving the culture industries in their perennial goal of ‘turning rebellion into money’. In this collection, scholars working out of very different contexts and academic traditions set out to examine this most complex and controversial of bands. Across a dozen original essays, the authors provide fresh insights into the music and politics of The Clash in ways that are by turns both critical and celebratory. While the book seeks to locate the band in their own time and place, it also underlines their enduring and indeed very contemporary significance. A common thread running though the essays here is that the songs The Clash wrote four decades ago to document a previous, pivotal moment of geopolitical transformation have a remarkable resonance in our own current moment of prolonged global turbulence. Written in a style that is both scholarly and accessible, Working for the clampdown offers compelling and original takes on one of the most influential and incendiary acts ever to grace a stage.

Editors: Lisa Shaw and Rob Stone

This book explains how the famous Spanish singer and actress Imperio Argentina starred in a film, Carmen, la de Triana, that was made in Berlin under the auspices of the Third Reich. It examines the Transition between the dictatorship and democratic eras in four films featuring performances in which transgendered protagonists lip-synch to songs from the Hispanic diaspora. The book considers how punk music and its attendant sensibility and cultural practices were profoundly influential in Spain throughout the early years of democracy. It focuses on one of the most financially successful Spanish films of the last ten years: El otro lado de la cama. The book moves to how punk music and its attendant sensibility and cultural practices were profoundly influential in Spain throughout the early years of democracy. This was when the Spanish version of British punk's irreverence, playful and disrespectful attitude toward art, bad taste, and corrosive humour nevertheless failed to capitalise on the political overtones of the original movement. The book lays emphasis on music as an indicator of the attitudes, social hierarchies and demarcations of youth but marks a shift in focus towards flamenco. Continuing the interwoven themes of rootlessness and evolution, it examines the diegetic and non-diegetic contribution of songs to representative films of the so-called 'immigration cinema' genre within Spanish cinema. Next come the exploration of transnationalism, migration and hybridity by exploring the role of Afro-Cuban song, music and dance in two films from Mexican cinema's golden age: Salón Méxicoand Víctimas del pecado.

Abstract only
From protest to resistance

Introduction: from protest to resistance Matthew Worley, Keith Gildart, Anna Gough-Yates, Sian Lincoln, Bill Osgerby, Lucy Robinson, John Street, Peter Webb Rumours of punk’s death have long been exaggerated. The earliest known record of its passing was Monday 20 September 1976, the first of a two-day ‘Punk Special’ held at London’s 100 Club featuring the Sex Pistols, The Clash and a handful of other bands converging towards a distinctive scene based on stripped-down rock ’n’ roll and a confrontational aesthetic at odds with mainstream pop culture and the last

in Fight back
Debates over cultural conventions in French punk

7 Distortions in distance: debates over cultural conventions in French punk Jonathyne Briggs On 6 May 1968, a cadre of French police entered the Sorbonne to restore order, called by administrators in response to the alleged destruction of auditorium chairs, three to be exact, caused by the student occupation that began earlier that weekend in protest against the actions of administrators at the Nanterre campus. The subsequent mêlée between the police and students sparked broader protests, as young workers instigated a series of strikes through France during the

in Fight back
I was a pre-teen fanzine writer

12 From Year Zero to 1984: I was a pre-teen fanzine writer Nicholas Bullen Approaching Year Zero Punk smashed into my consciousness like a boot through a television screen. I was 10 years old in 1978, living in a small village located between the cities of Coventry and Birmingham in the Midlands of England. With the exception of a somewhat unwholesome interest in horror literature, my juvenile tastes tended towards the universal – riding bicycles, reading comics, eating ice cream: music played no great role. However, a seismic shift occurred when punk abruptly

in Ripped, torn and cut
Abstract only

1 Introduction When I was 10 years old I was introduced to a ‘music world’ (on ‘worlds’ see below and Chapter 2) which had a huge impact upon me. The excitement I experienced in relation to punk gave me a lifelong passion for music. It established music as a key element in my identity and relationships, wedding me to practices of record-buying, gig-going and rudimentary music-making which I still participate in with passion today. Moreover, beyond music, punk aroused my interest in politics, the society I lived in and various fascinating political and aesthetic

in Networks of sound, style and subversion
Auteurship and exploitation in the history of punk cinema

11 Silver screen sedition: auteurship and exploitation in the history of punk cinema Bill Osgerby ‘Will your school be next?’: mischief and mayhem at Vince Lombardi High Teen rebellion is a force to be reckoned with at Vince Lombardi High School. The setting for the punk-musical-comedy Rock ’n’ Roll High School (1979), Lombardi High has seen a succession of principals driven to despair by the recalcitrant students. Led by Riff Randell (P. J. Soles) – a nonstop party girl and fervid fan of punk stalwarts, the Ramones – the school kids are a font of adolescent

in Fight back
The punk scene in Munich, 1979–82

17 Contradictory self-definition and organisation: the punk scene in Munich, 1979–82 Karl Siebengartner This chapter presents a history from below that draws on fanzines to show the complexity of Munich’s punk scene between 1979 and 1982. In so doing, the function of fanzines within a local space will be demonstrated, shedding light on the inner workings of a particular punk milieu. Punk in Munich has yet to be adequately researched. But through this case study, assumptions as to the development and influence of German punk can be reviewed. Methodologically

in Ripped, torn and cut
Abstract only

11 Conclusion In this book, drawing upon Howard Becker’s (1982) concept of ‘art worlds’, I have conceptualised punk and post-punk as ‘music worlds’ existing both on the local, city level and also spanning towns and cities, on a national level. Concentrating upon the 1975–80 period I have tried to explain: 1 The emergence of the first UK punk world, in London. 2 The process of diffusion which carried punk to other towns and cities, leading to the emergence of punk worlds in those cities too. 3 The transformation of punk, in several of these worlds, into

in Networks of sound, style and subversion