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Nick Crossley

11 Conclusion In this book, drawing upon Howard Becker’s (1982) concept of ‘art worlds’, I have conceptualised punk and post-punk as ‘music worlds’ existing both on the local, city level and also spanning towns and cities, on a national level. Concentrating upon the 1975–80 period I have tried to explain: 1 The emergence of the first UK punk world, in London. 2 The process of diffusion which carried punk to other towns and cities, leading to the emergence of punk worlds in those cities too. 3 The transformation of punk, in several of these worlds, into

in Networks of sound, style and subversion
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Author: Rowland Wymer

Michael Derek Elworthy Jarman as a true 'Renaissance Man' in the colloquial sense of the word, as well as having a strong and permanent interest in the art, thought, and literature of the Renaissance. Although the tone of Jarman's films is frequently melancholic, the threat which death poses for desire is sometimes modulated by an apparent desire for death. He was never comfortable with the label 'gay', regarding it as both too stable and too self-satisfied, too concerned to present a 'positive' image. He preferred the more fluid and mobile term 'queer'. Jarman's first feature-length film was remarkable in many ways and in at least three respects was virtually unique at the time for a commercially distributed picture. In 1977, the year of the Queen's Silver Jubilee, punk had spread beyond a handful of clubs and bands in London and New York and was starting to look like a complete new youth culture in the making. From 1978 to 1985, whatever else he was engaged in, Jarman's life was dominated by his desire to make a film about the life of the Italian painter Caravaggio. Wittgenstein had been a completely unexpected commission which Jarman, despite his failing health, had rapidly and brilliantly converted into 'A Derek Jarman Film' through his usual intense personal identification with his subject. Blue was one of a cluster of films addressing the issue of AIDS which were released in the early 1990s.

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Adventures in reality: why (punk) fanzines matter
Matthew Worley, Keith Gildart, Anna Gough-Yates, Sian Lincoln, Bill Osgerby, Lucy Robinson, John Street and Pete Webb

Introduction: adventures in reality: why (punk) fanzines matter Matthew Worley, Keith Gildart, Anna Gough-Yates, Sian Lincoln, Bill Osgerby, Lucy Robinson, John Street, Pete Webb I’m scribbling this down at work so I can’t let the prose flow but I couldn’t care. There’s only one way to defeat the two evils (boring established groups & straight record shops) and that is to ignore them completely. Tony D., Ripped & Torn, no. 1 (1976) It may seem strange that something so ephemeral should warrant historical attention. Typically made with wilful irreverence and

in Ripped, torn and cut
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Positive punk
Richard Cabut

13 Kick: positive punk Richard Cabut In the autumn of 1982, I was living in a punk squat in New North Road, London, N1, a walk from Old Street, unreconstructed and sort of scary/lairy at that time. On one occasion I was mugged for 26½ pence; all I had in my pocket and pretty much all I had in the world. I was on the dole and spent my time conducting a fruitful lifestyle based on what I described in my fanzine Kick as ‘creativity, individuality and rebellion’.1 Kick 4 had been published at the end of that summer and had attracted a fair amount of attention from

in Ripped, torn and cut
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The role of women in punk fanzine creation
Cazz Blasé

4 Invisible women: the role of women in punk fanzine creation Cazz Blase The role of women and girls in the creation of 1970s punk fanzines is largely unacknowledged. Because this area of punk fanzine research is so underdeveloped, this chapter will be situated within a much longer time period than is usual, beginning both pre-punk and pre-1970s. This is in order to reflect the contribution women have made towards independent printing and publishing from the nineteenth century onwards. There are a number of of key moments of pre-punk agitation in print that have

in Ripped, torn and cut
Nick Crossley

6 The evolution of the London network In the previous chapter I argued that London’s punk world was the effect of interaction and collective effervescence within a critical and connected mass of underground music enthusiasts. In this chapter I track the evolution of this world and the network which underpinned it. I investigate the formation of ties between pioneer punks, the emergence of punk’s stylistic conventions and the broader relational dynamics and division of labour between protagonists. The main body of the chapter comprises a narrative account

in Networks of sound, style and subversion
City Fun and the politics of post-punk
David Wilkinson

5 ‘Pam ponders Paul Morley’s cat’: City Fun and the politics of post-punk David Wilkinson Manchester’s City Fun (1978–83) bears all the hallmarks of punk fanzine media. Early issues in particular feature impulsive anti-authoritarian rants alongside reviews and ruminations on the meaning of punk. City Fun’s often striking covers varied in style, though Dada-indebted collages by Linder Sterling and Jon Savage captured a distinctively post-punk structure of feeling; one riven by the crisis of the political conjuncture, which nevertheless offered glimpses of utopia

in Ripped, torn and cut
Rowland Wymer

King’s Road clothes shop owned by Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood and who embodied the emerging punk style which the shop was busy promoting. She had appeared briefly, with a strikingly anachronistic blonde punk haircut, in the opening scene of Sebastiane as Mammea Morgana, the famous prostitute who ‘has slept her way from Bath to Rome’, and Jarman now wanted to make a semi-documentary film about her and her London

in Derek Jarman
Toxic Grafity’s punk epiphany as subjectivity (re)storying ‘the truth of revolution’ across the lifespan
Mike Diboll

11 ‘Mental liberation issue’: Toxic Grafity’s punk epiphany as subjectivity (re)storying ‘the truth of revolution’ across the lifespan Mike Diboll1 All that follows below is data Alec Grant (2013) What was I thinking when, in the summer of 1980, I subtitled issue 5 of Toxic Grafity the ‘mental liberation issue’?2 As Matt Worley notes, Toxic featured ‘politically charged collage, essays on anarchy and diatribes against state repression’ in which the music coverage was ‘all but subsumed within a series of nihilistic ruminations on the inanity of work, the

in Ripped, torn and cut
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Countercultural and alternative radical publishing in the decade before punk
Jess Baines, Tony Credland and Mark Pawson

-1Doing it ourselves: countercultural and alternative radical publishing in the decade before punk Jess Baines, Tony Credland and Mark Pawson Alternative do-it-yourself (DIY) publishing in the UK is often assumed to have started with photocopiers and punks. However, counterculture and grass-roots movements from the mid-1960s onwards generated an explosion of alternative ‘not for profit’ print and publications, frequently produced by amateurs using basic technologies. Much of this was consciously infused with notions of autonomy and anti-specialism, themes that

in Ripped, torn and cut