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‘Crisis music’ and political ephemera in the emergent ‘structure of feeling’, 1976–83

this dominant narrative via two debates; one, which emphasised the ‘crisis of the left’, was initiated in 1978 by Eric Hobsbawm’s ‘The Forward March of Labour Halted?’ and identified the political consequences of the fracturing of the traditional working class; the other was initiated by Stuart Hall’s analysis of Thatcherism in 1979, which emphasised the ‘rise of the right’.3 While a number of accounts of punk raise criticisms of racism and sexism, other stories of this period remain unacknowledged or neglected, particularly ‘Crisis music’ and political ephemera

in Fight back
Popular music

marked increase in popular music-making activities across Northern Ireland. An unforeseen consequence of the Miami Showband massacre had been an expansion of domestic music making, with local bands filling the vacuum left by the de facto touring boycott of more established international acts.9 At precisely the same time, moreover, the empowering ‘do it yourself’ ethos of punk was convincing many youngsters in Northern Ireland to write songs that engaged with their own everyday lives. Punk in Northern Ireland: from ‘Alternative Ulster’ to ‘utter escapism’ The emergence

in Northern Ireland after the troubles
Open Access (free)

comprised a family who lost a possible home for themselves. In terms of squatter capital, their status as a family meant that the squatting community expected less from them than if they were young single punks, for example, and so they did not lose any capital by this failed action. The members of the kraakspreekuur, and especially the spokesperson, felt the embarrassment of this failure because with planning, they could have easily prevented and avoided such mistakes. Although I never spoke with the spokesperson

in The autonomous life?

feelings about their experiences as squatters. This sharply differed from those of male squatters who tended to narrate their experiences according to plots which centered events that revealed squatter capital, such as their participation in a violent eviction, their managing of a campaign, or their involvement in a social center. Svenke is a punk Swedish squatter with long blond dreadlocks in her late twenties who came to the Netherlands to study in the university. Her entire wardrobe consists of black clothing

in The autonomous life?

through the sitex and opened the doors within minutes. With the noise and the sparks from the motor flexes cutting through the metal, the door breaking was highly performative and, “so cool,” extolled Stijn, a nineteen-year-old squatter who was learning how to be a breaker. Three different living groups resided in the Motorflex houses. Self-identified punks who were referred to by their neighbors simply as “the punks” – both crusty and baby – resided in the two center houses. They shared a living room and

in The autonomous life?
Open Access (free)
The economy of unromantic solidarity

-war, apocalyptic nightmare. Dilapidated buildings and trash dominated the scenery and starkly contrasted the neat streets, shiny renovated architecture, and cute cafes that abound in Amsterdam of the 2000s. The filmmakers interviewed Morris at age eighteen, wearing a punk leather jacket, handsome, earnest, and articulately explaining his political motivations to squat with enthusiasm and sincerity. The next time I viewed the same documentary was in 2007, with a group of squatter friends. When Morris appeared on the screen, the

in The autonomous life?
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Support the Miners group, punk, youth culture and the far left, the British peace movement and communism, the far left and the 2010 election, the decline of the Communist Party, and the politics of Red Action (among others). Much of this scholarship is by a generation of emerging academics, bringing new historical insights and techniques to the study of the far left traditionally dominated by labour history scholars and those from political science. As this volume shows, the study of the history of the far left in Britain brings together scholars from a variety of

in Waiting for the revolution
Open Access (free)
The autonomous life?

Every Saturday night for thirty years, the renowned Vrankrijk, a squatters’ social center, has hosted a dance party which attracts a mix of squatters, punks, artists, radical left activists, hippies, university students, and tourists seeking to taste the underground scene in Amsterdam. Located on a beautiful street in the inner city, the building is enormous, standing four-stories tall, its facade covered by colorful murals in stark contrast to the eighteenth-century dollhouse architectural landscape of

in The autonomous life?
Abstract only

his PhD on British communism. Matthew Worley’s essay offers Wrigley.indb 10 08/03/2017 17:45:34 Introduction 11 a fascinating insight into how the CPGB and the Young Communist League sought to engage with punk music at a time when the party was losing member­ship rapidly, in the decade or so before the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. Stimulated by the writings of Martin Jacques, and other prominent members of the CPGB, the attempt to embrace the anti-commercial music establishment of the emerging youth culture in the 1970s led to

in Labour and working-class lives
Theatre as critic and conscience of Celtic Tiger Ireland

action turns: Hole will transfer 660 acres of church land to Wall’s company, Omnivore, and Omnivore will sign 49 per cent of the land over to Mongy’s wife’s company, Chieftain Holdings, for £1. Mongy will ensure no government action is taken on foot of rumours of child abuse at the Corrective Academy for the Sons of the Unruly run by Fr Hole and his brother, Fr Gabriel Hole. By the end of the act, however, Mammy and Daddy have avenged the sexual abuse of their friends’ son by killing and eating Father Hole, and taking possession of his pub. Punk Alice, the mother of

in From prosperity to austerity