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Cara Delay

except for the clock’s ticking and a couple of women whispering …  [when my turn came] I found Fr. Stack sitting beside the fire with his back to the door head propped on one hand the confession stole draped around his neck … .114 Then the mass itself took place in the kitchen, often the largest room in the house, where the congregation constructed a makeshift altar out of the kitchen table and chairs.115 The altar’s location in the kitchen 164 irish women also affirmed the religious and household authority of the woman of the house. For many people, the station

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
David Geiringer

signified a broader dispute that had emerged within Catholicism during the post-war years – what, or more pointedly who, constituted the ‘Church’? This question continues to represent a point of dispute amongst members of the Catholic community, but is only beginning to be engaged with by historians of religious change. As such, this chapter will adopt a broader, historically accurate, definition of the term

in The Pope and the pill
Cara Delay

drama of modern Irish Catholicism. In their petitions to their religious superiors, lay Catholic women often referred to their relationships with their parish priests and curates.3 This correspondence thus provides a window onto both women’s agency as letter-writers and petitioners and the complex relationship between women and the clergy from 1850 to 1950.4 For some women, in an age of Church revival and renewal, the priest came to represent a caring and trustworthy authority figure, even a confidant. The relationship between women and priests, however, was contested

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Abstract only
Cara Delay

’ identity formation within the community and the family, and girls themselves became integral to the creation of Ireland’s modern Catholic culture.2 At parish rituals such as the bishop’s visitation of parishes and First Communion, girls experienced devotion, awe, and anxiety. As they encountered a pervasive religious material culture in the community and in the home, girls learned to associate the physical, sensual, and corporeal with their faith.3 Girls’ devotional experiences also further document the unique combination of change and continuity that characterised women

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
David Geiringer

to familial duties. As the following chapter demonstrates, this modern life-cycle stage was of particular significance for the sexual and religious development of married Catholic women in post-war England. Later marriage broadly denotes the years of sexual activity that came after the daily demands of childrearing had diminished. 2 The parameters of this life

in The Pope and the pill
Stephen Penn

church is ‘the congregation of all of those predestined to salvation’ ( 27i ). This definition, he suggests, underlies many of the diverse conceptions of the church that are found in scripture. It is this church, he goes on to suggest, that we should properly identify as the bride of Christ. The head of the church, we are told, is uniquely Christ himself, and its members are his limbs. Nobody can know for certain that he or she is among the predestinate, or even the foreknown (that is, those predestined to damnation), which meant that, for Wyclif, nobody could be sure

in John Wyclif
Abstract only
Stephen Penn

assessment of Wyclif’s campaign for church reform in the late fourteenth century did much to secure his reputation among Protestant intellectuals in Reformation and post-Reformation England and Europe. Bishop Bale, who himself became a religious exile after the institution of the Act of the Six Articles in 1539, and then again under the punitive regime of Mary Tudor, clearly felt that Wyclif had prophetically anticipated the course of church history in his own day. 2 For him, the Oxford scholar was like the ‘the morning star’ shining out in the darkness of his times, an

in John Wyclif
Stephen Penn

seems to many, sin has the nature of an order just as good does, but in respect of punishment, since order and good, in respect of their consequences, are equivalent. Hence, congregations of men whose union is more orderly are called orders according to a certain exemplary excellence over their inferiors (as I have said elsewhere). Second, order is taken to be a position given to a designated cleric by God for ministering sacramentally, in different ways. And thus there are seven orders, namely, ostiary, candle-bearer, reader, exorcist

in John Wyclif