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Cara Delay

except for the clock’s ticking and a couple of women whispering …  [when my turn came] I found Fr. Stack sitting beside the fire with his back to the door head propped on one hand the confession stole draped around his neck … .114 Then the mass itself took place in the kitchen, often the largest room in the house, where the congregation constructed a makeshift altar out of the kitchen table and chairs.115 The altar’s location in the kitchen 164 irish women also affirmed the religious and household authority of the woman of the house. For many people, the station

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
David Geiringer

signified a broader dispute that had emerged within Catholicism during the post-war years – what, or more pointedly who, constituted the ‘Church’? This question continues to represent a point of dispute amongst members of the Catholic community, but is only beginning to be engaged with by historians of religious change. As such, this chapter will adopt a broader, historically accurate, definition of the term

in The Pope and the pill
Cara Delay

drama of modern Irish Catholicism. In their petitions to their religious superiors, lay Catholic women often referred to their relationships with their parish priests and curates.3 This correspondence thus provides a window onto both women’s agency as letter-writers and petitioners and the complex relationship between women and the clergy from 1850 to 1950.4 For some women, in an age of Church revival and renewal, the priest came to represent a caring and trustworthy authority figure, even a confidant. The relationship between women and priests, however, was contested

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Abstract only
Cara Delay

’ identity formation within the community and the family, and girls themselves became integral to the creation of Ireland’s modern Catholic culture.2 At parish rituals such as the bishop’s visitation of parishes and First Communion, girls experienced devotion, awe, and anxiety. As they encountered a pervasive religious material culture in the community and in the home, girls learned to associate the physical, sensual, and corporeal with their faith.3 Girls’ devotional experiences also further document the unique combination of change and continuity that characterised women

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
David Geiringer

to familial duties. As the following chapter demonstrates, this modern life-cycle stage was of particular significance for the sexual and religious development of married Catholic women in post-war England. Later marriage broadly denotes the years of sexual activity that came after the daily demands of childrearing had diminished. 2 The parameters of this life

in The Pope and the pill