Valentina Vitali

conceptualised exclusively in terms of personal experience, at best of cultural memory, as if Ninón Sevilla’s films said no more about migration than that particular instance of it which was Ninón Sevilla. With the terms of the debate so poorly defined, how are we to decide if Ninón Sevilla’s films tell us something about migration or whether they do not? Frank Capra’s films may also say something about migration. How are we to begin to see what Ninón’s Sevilla’s films say about migration, and how it may differ from what Frank Capra’s films say about it – unless we think of

in Capital and popular cinema
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Staging art and Chineseness
Jane Chin Davidson

paradise from James Hilton’s 1933 novel Lost Horizon. Through her video installation, Chang reproduces the film fantasy that Frank Capra interpreted for his 1937 movie version of Lost Horizon, the story of a plane crash in the Himalayas that led to the discovery of Shangri-La, an ethno-fantastic place of immortality run by a Buddhist lamasery. Through her conceptual video, Chang literally re-constructs the elements of lore from Capra’s Shangri-La while working with the community of Xianggelila to build the sculptural replica of the aweinspiring mountains made from angled

in Staging art and Chineseness
The battle for consensus in A Very British Coup (Channel 4, 1988)
Joseph Oldham

the novel, lying out of step with new leader Neil Kinnock’s agenda to change the party’s image by shifting it further to the centre ground. Against this, however, Plater elected to fully embrace the wish-fulfilment aspect of Perkins as a humble workingclass hero and a staunch, principled last bastion of old Labour. He later described the narrative as ‘a traditional story about a guy from the sticks who takes on the big city slickers and almost wins: a combination of Dick Whittington and Robin Hood with a little bit of Frank Capra’s Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939

in Paranoid visions
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The role of popular culture between the wars
Christine Grandy

films they occupied the same largely comedic roles. American films, presumably less interested in deploying hierarchies of class, nevertheless also used working-class characters as comedy relief or, in Frank Capra’s films, as a b­ enevolent and silent group in need of representation by the protective middle-class hero. This was an idealised vision of class relations in a period initially marked by trade union militancy, and most memorably, the general strike of 1926. This class tension was reflected in the bestselling novels from the 1920s, which habitually avoided

in Heroes and happy endings
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Heroes, work, and nation
Christine Grandy

free/ It’s not my house/but it’s our house’. The ‘town’ that the city’s citizens make on the streets is one that is nevertheless idyllic and middle class in appearance, with clean rugs, proper furniture, and family dinners. This view of socialism was decidedly comfortable and community oriented and not particularly provocative. Likewise another American film, Capra’s popular Mr Deeds Goes to Town (1936), featured the naive but honest Longfellow Deeds giving his inherited fortune away to poor farmers affected by the depression after he is made cynical by the power

in Heroes and happy endings
Richard Rushton

the medium of film. The first of Cavell’s two books on Hollywood genres is on what he calls the ‘comedies of remarriage’. The film of that genre which most clearly plays out many of the themes I have been tracing throughout this chapter is Frank Capra’s seminal It Happened One Night (1934), the film that gives birth to the genre of remarriage comedies. Cavell’s reading of the film centres on the role of the famous blanket that divides the film’s yet-to-be-married couple, Peter (Clark Gable) and Ellie (Claudette Colbert), as they spend a night together in a motel

in The reality of film
Richard Rushton

between reality and unreality. Needless to say, both regimes of the image produce reality, while the main difference between them is that they produce different types of reality. Some examples should make this point clear. Frank Capra’s Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939), as an example of the movementimage, posits a true love between Jefferson Smith (James Stewart) and Clarissa Saunders (Jean Arthur), while clearly demonstrating to us the falsity of the passion between Smith and Susan Paine (Astryd Allwyn), the senator’s daughter. Smith’s love for Clarissa is thus ‘real

in The reality of film
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The influence of continental travel on the Irish houses of Frederick Hervey, the Earl Bishop, 1730–1803
Rebecca Campion

Grand Tour (1785–86), and on his return to Ireland put his energy into a new project. Three great houses: Ballyscullion and Ickworth Ballyscullion House, begun in 1787, was Hervey’s second great house, situated on picturesque Lough Neagh. Like Downhill, Ballyscullion illustrates how architectural influences from abroad found their way into County Londonderry through a well-travelled patron. Inspiration for the rotunda design came from both the Grand Tour and the Home Tour: the Pantheon of classical Rome, Palladio’s Villa Capra la Rotonda near Vicenza (1566) and Hervey

in Travel and the British country house
Acceptance, critique and the bigger picture
Anne B. Ryan

Pursuing a sense of connection along with personal development Both individuality and connectedness are important in challenging the dominant economic and social paradigm. The physicist and philosopher Fritjof Capra has observed that, through self-assertion, the individual maintains diversity and energy, which are essential to the creative potential of the whole. Combining individuality with integration into a group or collectivity makes for a healthy system.33 Modern ways of living emphasise individualism and compartmentalisation. Individuality is different from

in The end of Irish history?
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Jeffrey Richards

Police, Reap the Wild Wind, The Story of Dr Wassell and Samson and Delilah . But perhaps the director whose work was most in tune with the kind of family values Lux wanted to promote was Frank Capra. Between 1934 and 1951 when he temporarily ceased directing, every one of his films was adapted for the radio except for his black comedy Arsenic and Old Lace and his three political films ( Mr Smith Goes to Washington, Meet John Doe and State of the Union

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60