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Home ( 1993 ). She shows that the house as most important (inner) space in the ‘Female Gothic romance’ repeats the gendered external power structures and thus becomes the Bewährungsraum – the space of probation or trial and success – for a female subject (Gunzenhäuser 1993 , 22). As the house or inner space constitutes the realm of the beautiful , this

in Gothic Forms of Feminine Fictions

-century television adaptations of ‘the female Gothic’. Wheatley’s essay draws on feminist approaches to conceptualising the female audience in film and popular literature as well as television to argue that there is an intriguing web of connections between the programme makers (and behind them, the machinery of pre-publicity and marketing), the text and its audiences, in which the viewing context, the home, is of central importance. The main examples here are Rebecca (Carlton 1997), The Woman in White (BBC 1997) and The Wyvern Mystery (BBC 2000). Drawing on close textual

in Popular television drama
Robert Miles

couple, romantic love, primitivism, the pedagogic vision) afforded the basis of a strategy akin to the carnivalesque, where a resistance may be mounted. Women writers often employ just such a strategy in their representation of Gothic gardens while male writers reveal a divergent agenda. My angle of approach may seem odd here, as I work back towards the female Gothic from the vantage point offered by a

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
Monstrous marriage, maternity, and the politics of embodiment

: romantic love may lead, tragically, to what Coleridge describes as the ‘perilous place’ of the childbed where a woman and/or her child may meet their deaths (44). Galloway’s twenty-first-century critique adheres to the popular narrative and thematic development in the Female Gothic whereby the carceral nature of the Victorian domestic sphere gives way to the terror-inducing, carceral nature of the female body itself in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Notably, toxic, monstrous men are identified in the opera as hypocritical

in Adapting Frankenstein
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Nineties’ gothica

’ clichés of the (female) body and of female sexuality. Their heroines are female gothic subjects not only because they are motivated by the tension of abjection and desire, but also because their bodies radically challenge the notions both of a feminine ideal and of the monstrous-feminine. Mary Bradford in The Wives of Bath is a hunchback – and her story is structured by

in Gothic Forms of Feminine Fictions
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What is 'Gothic'?
Robert Miles

instabilities within the self. Gender is, to say the least, problematic here. Ellen Moers’s coinage the ‘female Gothic’ (1977: 107) has entered the critical vocabulary (Heller 1992 : 2). I argue that it is also feasible – and desirable – to speak of a ‘male Gothic’. In one respect one can take these terms as simply designating the sex of the writer. But at the same time the textual

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
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studies dealing with the Nordic (or rather Scandinavian) region as a whole are Leffler's essays on Gothic topography in Scandinavian horror fiction (2010; 2013) and female Gothic monsters (2016) and her entry on ‘Scandinavian Gothic’ in The Encyclopedia of the Gothic ( 2012 ). 8 Furthermore, Pietari Kääpä's 2014 book on ecology and contemporary Nordic cinema includes a chapter on contemporary Norwegian, Finnish and Icelandic horror films. 9

in Nordic Gothic
Open Access (free)
Female sexual agency and male victims

the patriarchy in some way.’ 20 This analysis of the mother is particularly relevant to scholarly discourse positioning the Female Gothic in opposition to the Male Gothic as in the latter the mother is often rearticulated into the most ‘unnatural’ mother of all: the incestuous mother capable of aggressive sexual agency or the power to refuse sexual access to the female body. An overrepresentation of

in Gothic incest
The medium and media of Fatal revenge

‘poetry without the ornament of verse’ 17 but instead by using poetry, in Gary Kelly’s terms, to hedge ‘the despised prose’ of the implicitly female Gothic novel ‘with bits of “serious literature”’, i.e. male-authored poetry. 18 Maturin’s epigraphs, with their predominantly male-centred, classical poetic references – the majority refer to verses taken from the works of Shakespeare, Horace, and Virgil

in Charles Robert Maturin and the haunting of Irish Romantic fiction
Open Access (free)
Thefts, violence and sexual threats

representation of the overthrow of a tyrannical father, by showing the father to have been a usurper all along’. 5 If this is true of Walpole’s work, then later Gothic novels take up this Oedipal drive in a different way, exposing the figure of the uncle as usurper of both the rightful father and the niece. Although many scholarly accounts claim that one of the hallmarks of the Female Gothic is a tendency to show the father as

in Gothic incest