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Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

Introduction The 2010 Haiti earthquake has been described as a ‘game changer’ for the implementation of technologies in humanitarian response ( Sandvik, 2014 : 26). Established and emergent information and communication technology (ICT) applications were employed in the earthquake’s aftermath and ‘relief efforts quickly became a living laboratory for new applications of SMS texting, interactive online maps and radio-cell phone hybrids’ ( Nelson et al. , 2010

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rethinking Digital Divides by Linda Leung
Antonio Díaz Andrade

backgrounds. The book addresses the overarching question of how individuals from refugee backgrounds use digital technology to fulfil their communication and information needs. In doing so, Leung describes the scenarios and challenges that refugees face in the three stages that typically describe their journeys: before displacement, during displacement (in transit, refugee camps or detention centres) and resettlement. In her analysis, she rejects the simplistic conceptualisation of the digital divide as a matter

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Emmanuelle Strub

maintaining consent from beneficiaries, local authorities, belligerents and other stakeholders’ ( Fast and O’Neill, 2010 ). And building such relationships requires not only time but human resources with interpersonal, communication and negotiation skills. Although those annual security trainings were an opportunity to remind colleagues that implementing an acceptance strategy required budgeting and planning, only once in five years was

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

campaign, I outline how it simultaneously highlights the vulnerability and ‘worthiness’ of certain groups of Palestinian refugees (a well-worn, and equally critiqued, fundraising strategy) while also centralising certain Palestinians’ agency and rights. Considering hypervisibility and invisibility ( Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, 2016a ), I argue that the international campaign’s celebration of specific groups of Palestinian refugees and its prioritisation of communication with international audiences simultaneously dismisses the roles and rights of diverse groups

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

’ , Information, Communication & Society , doi: 10.1080/1369118X.2018.1521457 . Scott-Smith , T. ( 2016 ). ‘ Humanitarian Neophilia: The “Innovation Turn” and Its Implications’ , Third World Quarterly , 37 : 12 , 2229 – 51 , doi: 10.1080/01436597.2016.1176856 . University of Oxford, Refugee Studies Centre ( 2015 ), ‘ Principals

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

, batteries die; they no longer enjoy playing with the gadgets or data visualisations; they fail to see progress or achieve their primary goals, which makes tracking tedious ( Kristensen and Ruckenstein, 2018 ). In contrast, in research on the Global South, the focus is typically on connectivity and communication rather than on datafication and digitised self-care ( Ruckenstein and Schüll, 2017 ). Nonetheless, research on the power aspects of tracking in the Global North offers valuable insights

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

the Bharatiya Janata Party ( Mishra, 2017 ). And latterly, with considerable contribution from contemporary technologies of mass communication and voter manipulation, it has been institutionalised through the ballot box. The election (or near-election) of demagogic, right-wing nationalists in Europe in recent years seems indicative of a growing preference for illiberal democracy in the cultural home of liberalism. In opposition to liberal migration and trade policies, Europeans have increasingly opted for a closing-inwards of the nation state

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

agreement reached at the WHS, termed the ‘grand bargain’, and deliver more cost effective and efficient humanitarian aid would require the innovation of systems, processes and practice embedded at an unprecedented level across the entire sector ( Ki-moon, 2016 ). Innovation has long been an essential function of humanitarian work. Innovative products, approaches and processes are so commonplace that for functions like information communication technology (ICT) there are

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

direct action, which reached its peak in the late 1980s, humanitarian innovation sits comfortably with private partners and corporate sponsorship ( Zyck and Kent, 2014 ), a necessary recalibration given its dependence upon what can be called the computational turn – that is, since the 1990s, the seamless penetration of commercial information and communication technologies, software platforms, automating apps and screen interfaces into all aspects of personal, social, national and international life tout court . Humanitarian innovation is politically

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

impact, including the scarcity of resources like water, and the mass displacements that are likely to come with climate change. Then there is rampant inequality and the consequent rise of populism, the revival of this kind of national chauvinism being likely to hamper international cooperation. Allied to this is the revival of various forms of religious and ideological fanaticism across the belief spectrum, creating intolerance, violence and instability. The impact of technology is also not necessarily benign, allowing easy communication, yes

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs