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Bryan Fanning

discriminatory and exclusionary practices. 88 Racism and social change in Ireland The Hungarian refugees (1956-58) Ratification of the UN Convention on Human Rights (1951) The ratification of the UN Convention (1951) by the Irish state in 1956 was accompanied by a pronounced enthusiasm to admit refugees from Hungary. On 13 November 1956, just over two weeks before the UN Convention was ratified, the government agreed to grant asylum to 250 refugees from Hungary. Soon after this number was increased to 1,000. The Minister of Defence, who was in charge of refugee reception

in Racism and social change in the Republic of Ireland
Bryan Fanning

Travelling People (1995) reveal shifting official responses to Travellers. One account of these shifts might be summarised as follows: • a shift from constructing Travellers themselves as a problem experienced by ‘normal’ people (i.e. the settled community) to 154 • Racism and social change in Ireland constructing the problem in terms of the relationship between Traveller and settled communities with, by 1995, some emphasis on discrimination against Travellers by the settled community. a growing acceptance that Travellers have a distinct culture and, by 1995

in Racism and social change in the Republic of Ireland
Bryan Fanning

Irish nationalism within the mass movement seeking Catholic Emancipation and resolution of other Catholic grievances such as tithes, bias in the judiciary, and Protestant proselytisation. In 1823 the Catholic leader, Daniel O’Connell, formed ‘the Catholic Association’, which developed from the then 32 Racism and social change in Ireland usual form of political organisations with membership drawn from social elites into an innovative mass movement which sought to mobilise hitherto excluded social classes within constitutional politics. Mass participation in the

in Racism and social change in the Republic of Ireland
Bryan Fanning

aspects of anti-Semitism in Ireland are illustrated by one of the characters in Joyce’s Ulysses, set in 1904, the year of the 60 Racism and social change in Ireland Limerick pogrom, who states that Ireland is the only country which has never persecuted the Jews because she never let them in. The character, Mr Deasy, a Protestant, is an anti-Semite. He considers that England - her finance, her press - is in the hands of the Jews and that the Jews, wherever they are present, are to blame for the decline of nations. Deasy makes the point that the Jews have ruined

in Racism and social change in the Republic of Ireland
Open Access (free)
Photography and Social Change in James Baldwin’s America
Makeda Best

This essay explores an exhibition at the Harvard Art Museums, installed in the fall of 2018, entitled Time is Now: Photography and Social Change in James Baldwin’s America.

James Baldwin Review
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Phreno-Magnetism and Gothic Anthropology
Alison Chapman

This essay addresses the socio-cultural potential of phreno-mesmerism in the mid-nineteenth century and how its good intentions were frustrated by its uncanny discourse. Supporters of phreno-mesmerisms social agency dreamed that the physiological make-up of future generations could be determined by engineering sexual partnerships. But the more earnestly the new hybrid science was advanced as a tool of social change, the more the discourse of phreno-magnetism proved unwieldy. In effect, the discourse represents a double-bind, intertwining sex and gender, essentialism and constructionism, science and the occult, materialism and Gothic. The article focuses of Elliotson‘s enthusiasm for uniting phrenology and mesmerism in his notorious Letter On Mesmeric Phrenology and Materialism (1843).

Gothic Studies
A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis, Luisa Enria, Sharon Abramowitz, Almudena-Mari Saez and Sylvain Landry B. Faye

, J-P. ( 2005 ), Anthropology and Development. Understanding Contemporary Social Change ( London : Zed Books ). Oosterhoff , P. and Wilkinson , A. ( 2015 ), ‘ Local Engagement in Ebola Outbreaks and Beyond in Sierra Leone ’, IDS Practice Paper in Brief , 24 , www

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Women and family in England, c. 1945–2000
Author: Angela Davis

This book examines women’s experiences of motherhood in England in the years between 1945 and 2000. Based on a new body of 160 oral history interviews, the book offers the first comprehensive historical study of the experience of motherhood in the second half of the twentieth century. Motherhood is an area where a number of discourses and practices meet. The book therefore forms a thematic study looking at aspects of mothers’ lives such as education, health care, psychology, labour market trends and state intervention. Looking through the prism of motherhood provides a way of understanding the complex social changes that have taken place in the post-war world. This book will be essential reading for students and researchers in the field of twentieth-century British social history. However it will also be of interest to scholars in related fields and a general readership with an interest in British social history, and the history of family and community in modern Britain.

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Journalism in twentieth-century Ireland
Author: Mark O’Brien

This book examines the history of journalists and journalism in twentieth century Ireland. While many media institutions have been subjected to historical scrutiny, the professional and organisational development of journalists, the changing practices of journalism, and the contribution of journalists and journalism to the evolution of modern Ireland have not. This book rectifies this deficit by mapping the development of journalism in Ireland from the late 1880s to today. Beginning with the premise that the position of journalists and the power of journalism are products of their time and are shaped by ever-shifting political, economic, technological, and cultural forces it examines the background and values of those who worked as journalists, how they viewed and understood their role over the decades, how they organised and what they stood for as a professional body, how the prevailing political and social atmosphere facilitated or constrained their work, and, crucially, how their work impacted on social change and contributed to the development of modern Ireland. Placing the experiences of journalists and the practice of journalism at the heart of its analysis it examines, for the first time, the work of journalists within the ever-changing context of Irish society. Based on strong primary research – including the previously un-consulted journals and records produced by the many journalistic representative organisations that came and went over the decades – and written in an accessible and engaging style, this book will appeal to anyone interested in journalism, history, the media, and the development of Ireland as a modern nation.

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Author: Patsy Stoneman

This study portrays Elizabeth Gaskell as an important social analyst who deliberately challenged the Victorian disjunction between public and private ethical values, maintaining a steady resistance to aggressive authority and advocating female friendship, rational motherhood and the power of speech as forces for social change. Since 1987, Gaskell's work has risen from minor to major status. Despite a wealth of subsequent gender-oriented criticism, however, this book's combination of psychoanalytic and political analysis is challenging in its use of modern motherhood theories. It presents the original text unchanged (except for bibliographical updating), together with a new critical Afterword. The Afterword offers detailed evaluation of all the Gaskell criticism published between 1985 and 2004 that has a bearing on the book's subject, and thus provides both a wide-ranging debate on the social implications of motherhood and a survey of Gaskell criticism over the last twenty years. This edition, with an updated bibliography and index, will bring the book to a new audience, while also offering a comprehensive overview of current Gaskell studies.