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A new dimension of genocidal rape and its children

152 CBOW in the twentieth century conflict that took place after the signing of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). In order to ascertain whether, and if so how, this law impacted on the lived experiences of children fathered by foreign soldiers, the CRC will be explored in some detail and some of the key rights of particular interest to CBOW will be investigated in more detail against the background of conflicting rights of family and local community. Gender-based violence in Bosnia In late 1992, reports of sexual abuses committed during the armed

in Children born of war in the twentieth century

survival,6 the fact that they attempted to take 51 52 CBOW in the twentieth century some control over their circumstances, when the author proclaimed: ‘From now on I will decide who gets me’, which led to her being accused of ‘besmirching the honour of the German women’.7 As one reviewer rightly explains, the reason for the rejection of the book was less the subject matter itself, but her dealing with it. Her confession of agency, her damning picture of German men in the face of the rape campaigns, her differentiated view of the Red Army and the links with German

in Children born of war in the twentieth century

CBOW in earlier parts of the book. Peace support operations: special responsibilities for ‘special forces’? The UN as an organisation is tasked with the maintenance of peace and security, a tenet which should underscore the entirety of its operations, including 228 CBOW in the twentieth century peacekeeping missions, and should guide all its personnel, including all its soldiers, at all levels. Given this UN ethos, sexual misconduct and the exploitation and abuse of civilians are not only morally reprehensible, but also damaging to the credibility of the UN

in Children born of war in the twentieth century
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dancing.20 Much of the subsequent historical debate on women’s drinking habits pivots on what other factors might have actuated public house reform in interwar England. Stella Moss and Alistair Mutch portrayed brewer pub improvers as primarily profit-maximizers who focused on areas in which inhabitants’ patronage would defray cost of investment.21 This new research is appraised in Chapter 1. Currently, historians view enduring changes in women’s drinking habits as a product of the last half of the twentieth century.22 Claire Langhamer pointed to the Second World War as

in Women drinking out in Britain since the early twentieth century
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The Scottish military tradition in decline

implications of that relationship for Scottish society. It would follow therefore that the rapid decline of that empire in the second half of the twentieth century must have wrought profound changes for what we might call the ‘Scottish military establishment’ characterised above all by the Scottish regiments of the British army. And yet an examination of how the Scottish infantry regiments

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century

scramble for territory that occurred in the 1880s and 1890s. 3 His name, however, tended to be on the lips of many (and not just the British) engaged in that imperial/colonial enterprise. In the twentieth century, the appeal to Livingstone as the justificatory ancestor figure, the heroic antecedent that could be turned to many different ends, continued unabated. The missionary

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century

Irresistible to Women’, Publican, 3 July 1995; MORI, Public Attitudes to Pubs (June 1984), p. 50. 5 MORI, Public Attitudes to Pubs (June 1984), p. vii; Interscan, Ltd, Attitude Survey on Pub Going Habits and Brewery Control and Ownership of Public Houses (Aug. 1970), p. 13. This was a rare survey that analysed class, age, gender and types of drinking establishments. 6 Deidre McCloskey, ‘Paid Work’, in Ina Zweiniger-Bargielowska (ed.), Women in Twentieth-Century Britain (Harlow: Pearson Education Limited, 2001), pp. 168–70. 7 Heather E. Joshi, Richard Layard and Susan

in Women drinking out in Britain since the early twentieth century
Bringing Africa to the Scottish public

. 16 I. G. C. Hutchison, Scottish Politics in the Twentieth Century (Basingstoke, 2001), p. 71. 17 Ewen A. Cameron, ‘The Politics of the Union in an Age of Unionism’ in T. M. Devine (ed.) Scotland and the Union 1707–2007 (Edinburgh, 2008), pp. 126, 132

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century

house 49 industry, see Jutta Schwarzkopf, ‘Gender and Technology: Inverting Established Patterns. The Lancashire Cotton Weaving Industry at the Start of the Twentieth Century’, in Margaret Walsh (ed.), Working Out Gender: Perspectives from Labour History (Aldershot: Ashgate, 1999), pp. 151–66. 76 [Sydney O. Nevile], ‘The Ideal House’, House of Whitbread, 2 (Jan. 1926), p. 43. 77 Gourvish and Wilson, British Brewing Industry, table VIII; Evidence of the Royal Commission on Licensing, 12 Nov. 1930, p. 2107. 78 Ibid., pp. 2104, 2126, 2130; Brewers’ Journal, 15

in Women drinking out in Britain since the early twentieth century
Understanding the psychology of selling alcohol in the 1980s–90s

important findings, several outsiders rejected the sterile attitudes of conventional drinking and instead grasp the possibilities of a changing market, vividly demonstrated by the wine bar revolution. Nobody did more to redefine the culture of public drinking in the late twentieth century than Tim Martin and Crispin Tweddle, two entrepreneurs who not only shared ambition and business acumen but recognized the commercial potential of another group of outsiders, women. Martin and Tweddle, far from responding to new drinking habits in pubs, created an entirely new subculture

in Women drinking out in Britain since the early twentieth century