9780719079740_C07.qxd 7 5/8/09 9:23 AM Page 193 Khaled Abou El Fadl Islamic law, human rights and neo-colonialism My lecture will focus on the interface and tensions between the human rights tradition and the Islamic tradition, particularly Islamic law. What is the ‘Islamic tradition’ and, more particularly, the Islamic legal tradition? Islamic law stands in a paradoxical position vis-à-vis the human rights tradition. Western scholars have argued that the roots of the human rights tradition are to be found in Judaeo-Christian Natural Law, and more

in ‘War on terror’
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two events riveted the British-Bangladeshi community; beginning as local issues in London, both captured national and international media attention within a short span of time. These two apparently unrelated events revealed a disturbing trend within a small minority community who otherwise receive little attention and have been on the margin of British society for decades. Barring a few exceptions British-Bangladeshis remained invisible in the mainstream MUP_Riaz_IslamIdentity_Revised.indd 1 21/02/2013 16:30 2 islam and identity among british-bangladeshis media

in Islam and identity politics among British-Bangladeshis

W HAT is it like to be a Muslim who is possessed by a jinn spirit? How do you find refuge from madness and evil spirits when you live in a place like Denmark? In this book I analyse some of the ways in which Muslims in the West have sought to protect themselves. During fieldwork conducted over several years, I followed Muslim patients while they were being treated in a Danish mosque and in a psychiatric hospital. Some of the Muslims I worked with found healing in psychotropic therapy, but many turned to Islam to find protection from the

in Descending with angels
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I started this book by asking how it was that Islam was securitised in the US after 9/11, given that actors such as presidents George W. Bush, Barack Obama and even Donald Trump have continually sought to dispel fears that the war on terrorism is not a war against Islam. In effect, Obama and Bush reaffirmed that Islam is a peaceful religion and that Muslims are an integral part of American society, while Trump has reassured the American public that Executive Order 13769 preventing the entrance of individuals from Muslim-majority countries

in The securitisation of Islam

based upon the idea that Muslims are ‘predisposed’ to commit violence (Kumar 2012 , 147). Two main approaches to countering homegrown terrorism prevail in the US: the ‘hard’ approach, operated at the local level by city law enforcement agencies such as the police, and what is considered a softer approach, conducted by the federal government. By 2006–7, the DHS had the view that using the term ‘Islamic terrorism’ and focusing on the threat posed by Islamic groups was actually alienating the communities they sought to partner with. As a result

in The securitisation of Islam

's ( 2001 ) work on the discourse of evil and cruelty, I then demonstrate the impact of placing the Muslim community ‘at a distance’ and of the ‘remote securitisation’ of Islam. Finally, I offer a critique of the ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ approaches to countering terrorism considered in Chapter 4 by introducing two vantage points, one well established and the other more radical, from which the classical view collapses: Bourdieu's social and relational ontology and the idea of a quantum human. Embracing the notion of a quantum human erases the traditional

in The securitisation of Islam
A veiled threat

I N THE MIDDLE East, security is strongly influenced by politicized forms of fundamental belief systems. This chapter examines the dual role of political Islam, with specific focus on Palestine and the case of Hamas , the Islamic Resistance Movement, in the West Bank and Gaza. In this context, political Islam represents a general rejection of the Arab

in Redefining security in the Middle East
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fighting his regime, which would require an American invasion. Meanwhile, the new regime in Saudi Arabia, following the succession of King Salman to the throne in January 2015, seems almost as hostile to Iran and Shia Islam as it is to ISIS and has shifted from the kingdom’s traditional caution into a new phase of nationalism and military adventurism with unforeseeable political and humanitarian

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
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in protest against the use of ‘Allah’ to denote the God worshipped by Christians (which has always been the case among Arabic-speaking Christians). Curiously, few Christians regard the God of the Old Testament as incompatible with the triune God of Christianity. Nor does Siddiqui offer a comprehensive comparison between Christianity and Islam, about which sweeping

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
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model for engaged anthropology. I was only able to touch here on Ahmed’s discussion of Osama bin Laden (1957–2011), which is the subject of a whole chapter in his book, ‘Bin Laden’s dilemma: Balancing tribal and Islamic identity’. In bin Laden’s youth, as an economics student in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, he absorbed the ideas of the Egyptian scholar

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times