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? Why did Cumann na nGaedheal fail to capitalise on this position over the next decade? How did the Cumann na nGaedheal government address (or fail to address) Galway’s social and economic difficulties? Were the criticisms of local Cumann na nGaedheal party supporters justified? Was the party abandoning its republican past? Was the government becoming too removed from the communities it governed? Was it ignoring vital local issues? Did the political opposition offer any viable alternatives? Why did the west have to wait? These are some of the fundamental questions

in The west must wait
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with the local Fianna Fáil TDs. While in opposition, they had toured the county organising the party, mobilising political support and educating the people on its party programme. Fanning described it as ‘a time when Irish republicans no longer sulked in a self-imposed exile, but when they increasingly assumed the aspect of a government in waiting’.102 Between 1927 and 1932 Fianna Fáil built up a strong organisation. The Cumann na nGaedheal government underestimated it. By 1932 the Galway electorate was well versed in the Fianna Fáil policy for government – so much

in The west must wait

required to provide a financial estimate for putting its recommendations into practice. Therefore, the Executive Council had to wait for each state department to submit its own observations on the practicality and feasibility of the Commission’s recommendations before it could submit its official response.53 The Commission’s economic report read almost like a stocktaking of the Gaeltacht. Its recommendations included the implementation of comprehensive schemes of afforestation, arterial drainage and land reclamation; the protection and promotion of the fishing industry

in The west must wait
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local needs are met. Under our own native government we confidently looked, after weary years of waiting, for a peaceful and just settlement of the land question in this district. We are entirely dissatisfied with the arrangements that we learn are about to be made, and we earnestly warn the Government and all concerned that if they persist in forcing outsiders on us while our own have no prospects but the emigrant ship, the peace of the district will be seriously endangered. We are determined, if the injustice is persisted in, to resist it by every legitimate means

in The west must wait

, poor and well-to-do, old and young, widows and children, all alike have suffered in intimidation, persecution and expulsion … In one case, an old man who had not left when ordered to do so was visited by a gang, who smashed everything in his cottage … Under such coercion as this a large number of Protestants have left … The list of those proscribed is added to constantly, and every Protestant is simply waiting for his turn to come.53 At a joint pro- and anti-treaty Sinn Féin rally, held to protest against the attacks in Ballinasloe, Fr J. P. Heenan condemned the

in The west must wait

Seán Lemass visited Loughrea in September to address a meeting of the Fianna Fáil party, a large banner stretching across the street revealed the words ‘Loughrea wants Dr Ryan’. When Daly arrived to take up his new position in November a section of the waiting crowd broke through the cordon of guards drawn across the road and attacked his car with stones and other missiles. He resigned his post in December 1932.50 In national affairs, Cumann na nGaedheal rowed through a number of political storms including the Army Mutiny of 1924 and the rivalries it exposed within

in The west must wait
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‘We Want “U” In’

This short essay draws on research undertaken by the curator of the Scottish Screen Archive on the few surviving films credited to Greens Film Service of Glasgow in the teens and twenties. The research revealed a dynamic family business, born out of the travelling cinematograph shows of the late nineteenth century, growing to assume a dominant role in the Scottish cinema trade in the silent era, across exhibition, distribution and production. One small part of a lost film history waiting for rediscovery – early cinema in Scotland.

Film Studies

-management protocol and I was able to provide clear answers to those questions. However, I did not wait until 2013 to start training the heads of mission in how to manage serious incidents. The aim was to help them know what to do without relying exclusively on support and guidance from headquarters, which would arrive late if at all. At the end of the day, the heads of mission and field coordinators would be on the front line, and it would be up to them to make the initial decisions. I relied on the EISF (European Interagency Security Forum) network to set up the crisis

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local

never receives UNRWA’s circulars. 22 As such, he waited longer than the above-cited teacher for the ‘revised’ message pertaining to employment and pension changes to reach him: Those of us who are employed in the lower grades don’t receive e-mails, we need UNRWA staff who are higher up to tell us the news about our jobs and futures. Not everyone knows what is going on. And, remember, not everyone working for UNRWA, can read, including other people who work with me as cleaners and guards at the hospital. We need to wait for other colleagues to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

The civil war, particularly the disintegrated guerrilla phase of the war, did not spread across the whole county. Republican resistance in Galway was strongest in Connemara and in north Galway, but it appeared to lack precise direction. Republican supporters contended that priests, in essence, had become policemen, ordering and directing rather than counselling and advising the Catholic laity. One of the last significant engagements of the civil war was an assault on the barracks occupied by the Free State forces in Headford in north Galway on 8 April 1923. In the aftermath of the civil war, the August 1923 general election was fought on the Free State government's terms. Cumann na nGaedheal, the newly constituted pro-treaty Sinn Fein party, painted the August election as a contest between the constitutionalists and the militarists.

in The west must wait