J.W.M. Hichberger

exactness suggestive incidents in the byways of a campaign; but the great battles that decide the fate of armies and of great empires are now almost always left without record. 1 This quotation from the journal Art and Letters was written in 1881 – 82. The author has obviously identified what he/she believes to be a radically

in Images of the army
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J.W.M. Hichberger

the country had been rearming against fears of French invasion. This must have contributed to a general feeling that forty years of peace was too long. In fact the army had been active during that time but in remote colonies such as Canada, New Zealand, Africa and India. 3 Many commentators welcomed an opportunity for Britain to assert her authority and reclaim the position as arbiter of Europe

in Images of the army
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J.W.M. Hichberger

In the spring of 1815 Napoleon escaped from Elba, returned to France and reassembled his army. After the Hundred Days he was conclusively defeated by an allied army of Belgian, Prussian and British troops under the command of the Duke of Wellington. It might have been expected that the peace celebrations of the summer of 1814 would have stimulated the patronage and production of

in Images of the army

v 1 v The rise and origins of the People’s Armies On 7 June 1942 a group of 12 armed men arrived in Domnista, a large village located in the uplands of Evrytania in central Greece. The presence of armed bands was far from uncommon in the mountains during this turbulent period; however, it soon became obvious that these men were not mere bandits. They did not demand food or money from the peasants and avoided the shops and the village café. The group was led by  Thanasis Klaras, aka Ares Velouhiotes, a veteran communist cadre who later became one of the leaders

in A history of the Greek resistance in the Second World War

When Britain formally entered the First World War, the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC), a specialist corps responsible for providing medical care to British Army personnel, immediately deployed a significant contingent of medics to accompany the British Expeditionary Force. This included 900 medical officers, 10,000 other ranked members of the RAMC and

in Medicine, health and Irish experiences of conflict 1914–45

with celebrations of the army, often in an imperial context, with works like Tennyson’s Charge of the Heavy Brigade , Sir Francis Doyle’s Private of the Buffs and The Red Thread of Honour , Kipling’s Ballad of East and West and Henley’s own Last Post and Pro Rege Nostro. The binding themes of the collection are service, sacrifice, comradeship, heroism and death

in Popular imperialism and the military 1850–1950

all they needed reliable and trustworthy soldiers, who were unconditionally loyal. The manpower issue remained a constant problem for the directors of the VOC, becoming even worse during the nineteenth-century conquest of the Archipelago by the colonial army. 2 The problem could be solved after 1890 only by a renewed influx of Indonesian soldiers, who were simultaneously given a more prominent role in the fighting. And

in Guardians of empire
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Protestant majority, most of whom were of the working and middle classes (a significant proportion with previous military experience) to reinforce the Ulster Protestant volunteering tradition within the framework of the British Army, rather than within paramilitary organisations. The militia in Ireland relied on the working classes to fill its ranks, but this evolved significantly over time. This evolution involved a shift from a reliance on unskilled labour at the time of the Crimean War to a dependence on more skilled labour by the later nineteenth century. This was in

in The Irish amateur military tradition in the British Army, 1854–1992

1 Politics and strategy The history of the auxiliary forces of the United Kingdom, dating to long before 1660 and the creation of the first standing army, has been inextricably linked with political developments. This has been recognised by many historians looking at the British context of amateur soldiery.1 Similarly, in late eighteenth-century Ireland, the formation of a militia for home defence was heavily influenced by political considerations, particularly with regard to the distrust of the Volunteers and the inevitability of granting more power to the

in The Irish amateur military tradition in the British Army, 1854–1992
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in the regular army, to fill these important positions in county society. The emergence of the yeomanry during the war in South Africa highlighted the continued reliance on business interests for the maintenance of the officer corps, whilst also demonstrating that it had become a much more respectable pursuit than the militia. Furthermore, the creation of the OTC, VTC, TA and UHG show that, in line with Great Britain, a shift had been experienced, which reinforced the reliance on the Irish middle class to fill the officer corps. When the UDR was established, this

in The Irish amateur military tradition in the British Army, 1854–1992