Social mobility, heroism and naval manhood

through relations to each other – if in contradictory and conflictual ways’. 2 Popular representations of naval manhood in the mid- to late Victorian period highlight this relationship. As the navy served to symbolise both nation and empire, depictions of naval manhood came to embody Victorian manly ideals, which valued masculine attachments to family, home and empire. Yet

in From Jack Tar to Union Jack

film production, in a parallel to the American war film’s redeployment of the staples of pre-war genre cinema. In working to accommodate the documentary and entertainment film strands, early war productions often foregrounded naval and maritime activities, because the focus of fighting to date provided topical and propagandist examples: TNWC01 16/11/06 11:27 AM Page 33 British naval films and the documentary feature 33 Of the three armed services, it was the Royal Navy which was most frequently represented in serious war films between 1940 and 1943. The

in The naval war film
Abstract only
Gender, navy and empire

Sea and the Oxford Book of English Verse , was the incongruity between empire building and the alleged buffoonery of the sailor. In arguing that the British naval man was no caricature of the ‘Jolly Jack Tar’, ‘Q.’, as Quiller-Couch signed his work, recognised the centrality of naval manliness to both the success of the navy and the expansion of the empire. For ‘Q.’, Victorian naval seamen had

in From Jack Tar to Union Jack

merchants and pirate mercenaries in shaping the fortunes of the Malacca Straits and the region’s sultanates; amongst the most noted were the Orang Laut , or People of the Sea, 5 boat dwellers who lived a rootless and nomadic existence from coast to coast, being hired to serve as the sultan’s personal navies, fishermen, traders, and tax collectors. 6 Young’s proposal was

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67

the core principle of each was preserved through the KRNVR and its successor organisation, the Royal East African Navy (REAN). As discussed in the Caribbean, the value of such units became increasingly political and symbolic, as well as strategic, with the Admiralty stressing ‘the importance of encouraging the Colonial Naval Forces so that they may be a

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67
Abstract only
Quarantine and professional identity in mid nineteenth-century Britain

5 Policing boundaries: quarantine and professional identity in mid nineteenth-century Britain Lisa Rosner Introduction As the British imperial presence spread across the world’s inland seas and oceans from the late eighteenth through the nineteenth centuries, so too did deadly diseases like yellow fever, cholera and dysentery. Management of these diseases invariably created disputes between medical men in Royal Navy ships and those at the ports they visited, over whether specific diseases were communicable and, thus, whether there was any purpose to quarantine

in Mediterranean Quarantines, 1750–1914

films, which were in any case derived from pre-war generic staples. The suggested evolution of the combat film, as an assimilation of documentary influences, a representation of early war incidents and a modification of existing generic materials, is indicative of Hollywood’s adeptness and responsiveness, but the assumption of uniformity in the depiction of all the armed services presupposes a concomitant rigidity and standardisation. The difference of the Navy and naval war implies a representational subset. That said, despite the inclusion of all arms of the Navy

in The naval war film
Abstract only
Boyhood, duty and war

Cornwell’, from which proceeds were donated to the newly formed Cornwell Memorial Fund begun by the Navy League. 2 The sombre spectacle included detachments of soldiers and sailors, groups of children, among them eighty of Cornwell’s schoolmates from the Walton Road School, a local group of Naval Cadets, and Cornwell’s old Boy Scout troop as well as its Scoutmaster. The boy’s school headmaster, his former

in From Jack Tar to Union Jack
Abstract only

their way to a “Far Eastern Munich”’. 8 Lien , or moral conduct, thus held more gravitas for the Chinese population than expressions of Britain’s material supremacy, such as the Navy or finance, which constituted mien-tzu . This also raises a significant parallel within imperial theory and the Gramscian notion of hegemony, whereby

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67

In 1832, a small envelope was sent to the Admiralty in London from the coast of West Africa. Contained inside it was a handful of brown dust, described as the ‘testings’ taken from the timbers of HMS Black Joke . These powdered remnants were all that survived of one of the most famous and successful slave catchers in the history of the Royal Navy

in The suppression of the Atlantic slave trade